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Twokamprs
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm building a medicine cabinet with a small (14x17) flat panel door. I've cut the standard door profile using my raised panel router bits. The groove for the panel is 1/4", but the panel, cut from maple plywood, is slightly thinner than 1/4". (A) Being plywood and fairly small, can I simply glue the panel in the grooves without danger of shrinkage or expansion? (B) Any suggestions on how to secure the panel tight against the front of the profile for a tight look since it is loose in the groove? (I hope this makes sense)

Thanks again for your help.
 

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Old School
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24,027 Posts
Yes, you can glue the ply panel. You could slide some shim stock between the panel and grooves on the back side to hold it tight to the front. It wont look great on the inside tho. :smile:
+1. :yes: You could use the iron on wood tape along the edges, or you could just veneer the backside. Most ¼" plywood don't have decorative backs. Actually if you do that, it may look better than the front side. But, if your painting, it wouldn't matter.



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Twokamprs
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Discussion Starter #4
To avoid the look of shims in the back of the door, could I run a thin bead of glue in the panel groove, glue up the frame and panel, then clamp the assembly with the front facing down and place a light weight on the back of the panel to move it to the front of the groove and let it dry?

Feedback??
 

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To avoid the look of shims in the back of the door, could I run a thin bead of glue in the panel groove, glue up the frame and panel, then clamp the assembly with the front facing down and place a light weight on the back of the panel to move it to the front of the groove and let it dry?

Feedback??
Yes you can do this but you will still have gap on the inside between the panel and the rails and stiles.
 

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Twokamprs
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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for your valuable input to my dilemma. I ended up using the iron-on wood strips (2 thicknesses) trimmed to the edge of the groove. It ended up looking just as good on the back as the front.
 

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Old School
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Thank you all for your valuable input to my dilemma. I ended up using the iron-on wood strips (2 thicknesses) trimmed to the edge of the groove. It ended up looking just as good on the back as the front.
Glad that worked out for you. I've had to do that more than once.




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Hi I'm Joe and this is my first post here.

Same question as Twokampers except a drawer face, so before I route the dato groove with my 1/4" router bit and having a sloppy connection, i'm going to use the table saw for the dato and make two passes. Also, rather then dato jointing the styles & rails i'm going to attempt the pockethole, the Kreg Jig has been my favorite connection tool lately.
 

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Flat Panel Doors

You can buy 1/4 maple plywood laid up on an mdf core that is a full 1/4 thick and good on both sides. It's available in other species as well.

It won't help you this time, but it may be good to know if you make doors in any quantity.
 
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