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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dropped a kitchen door in my floor today put a nice gouge in the floor.

I cant find any info on this, so maybe you all have some ideas.

All I can think of is apply some heat to soften it, lift up and put some type of adhesive under the flap - vinyl glue? epoxy?
427135
 

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Difficult to say what to do, there are different kinds of vinyl flooring and they are installed differently. Most of them are individual planks that wouldn't be difficult to remove. You just cut the tile out and glue a new one in it's place. There are some though that have a tab on the sides and ends that have like two sided tape on them that lock together. You can usually tell those by walking on it or taping it. It would have a hollow sound to it. This kind is very difficult to get out and never looks right putting a new one back because they are not glued to the floor.

If you decide to cut it out cut it a little ways back from the edge and work up to the joint with a putty knife. If you have difficulty with the adhesive dip the putty knife in lacquer thinner and work up to the joint. After you get it out you can clean the floor underneath with some lacquer thinner and let it dry overnight before attempting to put a new strip of flooring. The concrete or wood will hold the solvent for quite a while and would interfere with the adhesion of the new flooring so if a solvent is used ample drying time is warranted.
 

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I have had some luck using a gasket cutter to cut out the bad area and replacing the circle with one cut from a good vinyl piece. Like doing a round inlay. Depending on the gasket cutter ( dull / sharp) the top edges sometimes bend in, but usually return to full height in a few days. Need to grain or pattern match.
I have seen some planking that may be too thick for this.
 

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Dropped a kitchen door in my floor today put a nice gouge in the floor.

I cant find any info on this, so maybe you all have some ideas.

All I can think of is apply some heat to soften it, lift up and put some type of adhesive under the flap - vinyl glue? epoxy? View attachment 427135
If the floor is lvp you should be able to replace the plank. If you don't want to go through that I have had success on vinyl floors using clear nail polish.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I would use a 5 Minute clear epoxy and get as much under the gap as possible. Use small amounts and make a couple layers if need be. DO NOT Tear up any of the flooring. It won't show in the long run. I've a similar repair on vinyl tile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
WNT, we are both thinking along the same lines. I wan to avoid cutting any vinyl & no way in heck I'm tearing any floor out.

I've got some extra planks, I'm going to see if I cana duplicate the damage & play around with it - see how the vinyl responds to a heat gun, vinyl glue vs. epoxy.

It's not that noticeable, I'm more concerned about water getting into the composite material, which looks something similar to MDF.
 

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WNT, we are both thinking along the same lines. I wan to avoid cutting any vinyl & no way in heck I'm tearing any floor out.

I've got some extra planks, I'm going to see if I cana duplicate the damage & play around with it - see how the vinyl responds to a heat gun, vinyl glue vs. epoxy.

It's not that noticeable, I'm more concerned about water getting into the composite material, which looks something similar to MDF.
If you are not going to replace that plank I would suggest a vinyl repair kit, something like this. https://www.amazon.com/Coconix-Vinyl-Leather-Repair-Kit/dp/B07JC7SFNS If you can fill the indentation you could draw the grain back on with a sharpie and put a chear vinyl spray over the top.
 

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Hey Dr., hope this might be of interest regarding adhesive. I have an upholstery job for the local Womens and Childrens hospital... repairing vinyl chairs. I was referred to Taylor's "Dynamic" vinyl adhesive for the vinyl fabric. Taylor has other vinyl flooring adhesives, as well. I had to order the Dynamic adhesive, as there is no local outlet for it here (Lafayette, La). Taylor products seem to be a highly regarded.

This map (link) shows there are outlets in the NE Florida area for Taylor adhesive products. I would think there may be a flooring company near you, such that you can get a free or cheap small quantity of a commercial adhesive, rather than testing with epoxy or other option. A good standing local flooring company might give you some tips for the best repair, also.

Sonny
 

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If you have extra planks you can tell if the pieces inter-lock. If they don't then, in my opinion, the way to go is remove the damaged piece and replace it. Any other repair will look just like that, a repair.
 

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where's my table saw?
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WNT, we are both thinking along the same lines. I wan to avoid cutting any vinyl & no way in heck I'm tearing any floor out.

I've got some extra planks, I'm going to see if I can, duplicate the damage & play around with it - see how the vinyl responds to a heat gun, vinyl glue vs. epoxy.

It's not that noticeable, I'm more concerned about water getting into the composite material, which looks something similar to MDF.
Give the extra plank a cornered blow with a hardwood scrap to duplicate the "wound". Then slice along edges so you can lift up that flap and put epoxy under it to level it out and retain the grain as much as possible. The cut line will be barely visible, if at all when finished. The hardest issue will be what to spray over the repair to get a durable and lasting finish ... if anything more then the epoxy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Give the extra plank a cornered blow with a hardwood scrap to duplicate the "wound". Then slice along edges so you can lift up that flap and put epoxy under it to level it out and retain the grain as much as possible. The cut line will be barely visible, if at all when finished. The hardest issue will be what to spray over the repair to get a durable and lasting finish ... if anything more then the epoxy?
WNT you and I think so much a like I'll call you my WWT doppelganger.

Except I have TWO table saws, OMG does that mean I need to get another one? LMAO......
 

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where's my table saw?
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WNT you and I think so much a like I'll call you my WWT doppelganger.

Except I have TWO table saws, OMG does that mean I need to get another one? LMAO......
No one here really knows how many table saws I have because that is a well kept secret. However, it's at least five that operate. The one I used one today doesn't have a "permanently" mounted splitter. I needed a 2 1/4" depth of cut which I made in two separate passes, and I am not able to do that with a splitter. A table saw collection like mine takes about 50 years if you feel so inclined. My last purchase was a $1200 craftsman hybrid on sale on Easter Sunday about 10 years ago for $486.00 .... for no obvious reason... but I didn't care, it was gonna come home with me. :)
 
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