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Discussion Starter #1
I am getting ready to stain/poly a chair that I am working on but I would like some suggestions on how to go about fixing a chip that is at the bottom of the leg. I was thinking of using a filler or wood epoxy, but I'm not sure how the satin will take. Please see the pics that I attached. Any advice is appreciated. Thank you.


 

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I use "Timber Mate" wood putty for a fill. Then de-waxed shellac as a sealer, a light touch with a graining pen to mimic the grain, more shellac to seal. Final coat to finish.
Bill
 

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I would not fill a spot that large on a chair leg. The least little bump and it would break off. I would use a block plane and shave the area to a flat surface and glue a piece of wood on the spot. Then it could be shaped back to the shape of the leg and finished.
 

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Steve is right, that's too big for fill. Only option is a dutchman. Luckily the wood has a uniform grain and you won't have to fight very hard to get a good grain match.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I had the same issue here

I would not fill a spot that large on a chair leg. The least little bump and it would break off. I would use a block plane and shave the area to a flat surface and glue a piece of wood on the spot. Then it could be shaped back to the shape of the leg and finished.
I planed the chipped out corner flat, then added a matching piece, glued it on then planed it back to the original surface.


In the case above I think I would saw a perpendicular kerf alightly beyond the top of the break and then chisel a flat toward it. There will be a small glue line, but it won't show down at the bottom. Reason being, is that in order to plane away the entire break point, you would have to waste too much off when making a flat. You would then have 2 long glue lines on either side, not my first choice. :no:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Notching out the bad area and gluing in a block was another idea that I was thinking about. Glad to see that it may be the best option for such a large chip. I attached an image and was wondering if I notch out this area, would I run into any problems with gluing or reshaping the block? I really appreciate all of your replies. Thank you.
 

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I think cutting that area out circled in red will be harder than what woodenthings has in his picture. What he has pictured is what I was trying to describe. Once trimmed down and sanded the repair will be almost invisible. If you make a cut across the grain you will have a joint end to end that will show and cutting further into the leg will weaken the leg of the chair.
 

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where's my table saw?
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That's it exactly

You can probably use a Japanese pull saw or other fine tooth saw to just make 2 cuts that will give the desired result. Then pare the surface flat with a "sharp" chisel....there are no dull one's. Are there?

Another thought is instead of a perpendicular cut on the up side consider a bevel that will meet the larger surface. The replacement block can be sanded to fit perfectly. Your big challenge will be finding a replacement block that matches the grain and color. Good Luck and show us how it worked out!
 

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It's a bit difficult to describe, but the fix would be an add on that the end that is to the left in your picture is tapered and the grain aligns with the surrounding wood. I call it a scarf cut repair...this picture will give you an idea how it would look. A cut and fit across the grain would be very obvious.






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