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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys (and gals).

I’m working on a small project for a friend. It’s a yarn swift used for knitting. Basically it’s a lazy Susan with arms. Pegs will go into the arms to wind and unwind yawn. I get a nice handmade scarf out of the deal!

Here’s the work in progress:



I’m by no means an expert when if comes to finishing so I’m looking for some direction here. And this is my 1st time working with Poplar.

I would like a natural satin finish (no stain). A “smooth as possible” finish is important since this will be used with delicate yarns.

So I’m looking for suggestions on sanding and finishing. Brush or wipe on? Oil or water based? What to do between coats? What to do after final coat (wet sanding? Steel wool?)...

Give me a quick step by step to produce the smoothest satin finish possible…

And I’ll post some pics of the final results!

Thanks!
 

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The easiest finish is probably spray shellac. The spray can type goes on thin and dries dries fast. Lightly sand between coats with 220 (assuming you've already sanded your way up to that point) It will leave a really nice snag-free durable finish for the yarn. Just don't spill alcohol on it.

Also spray laquer. Deft's finish laquer also dries fast and leaves the same type finish.
 

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Cabinetmaker
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Nick; before you finish it I would consider grabbing your router and putting at least an 1/8" radius on the edges.
The other finish that is great is Minwax Polycrylic, water based poly, dries in under an hr so recoats are ez and fast NO STEEL WOOL!!!!!!:no:
ScothBrite pads made for this purpose, paint stores normally have them, sometimes the Borg's also
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nick; before you finish it I would consider grabbing your router and putting at least an 1/8" radius on the edges.
The other finish that is great is Minwax Polycrylic, water based poly, dries in under an hr so recoats are ez and fast NO STEEL WOOL!!!!!!:no:
ScothBrite pads made for this purpose, paint stores normally have them, sometimes the Borg's also
Skymaster... I should have stated that I still needed to round off the arm ends then route all the edges. Worked on that tonight. And I did use a 1/8" radius! Good Call!



Back to Minwax Water Poly. I did originally pick up a small can of it with a nice synthetic brush for this job. Figured I'd at least try it on a sample piece since it dries so quick.

If I go ahead and use the water based poly I have some questions:

1) What's the final grit I should sand to? 220? I've read that sanding to a finer grit can clog pours of wood and leave a worse finish. I build flying models airplanes and cover with monokote. For those I sand up to 600 to make the surface as smooth as possible. I guess varnish finishing is different.

2) should I 220 sand between coats or is there something better? The can mentions NOT to use steel wool. Is that where those special scotch pads come in?

3) 3 coats should do it?

4) what about after the final coat? wet sand with 600?

5) Any good tips to finishing flat pieces like this? What order to brush top / sides / bottoms? I was thinking of making a quick "bed of nails" while I'm at it for this project (dull the nails). Brush the bottom, flip onto the bed, brush the top /sides without having to handle again till dry.

6) is there a good product I should apply when all done. Such as a wax or something?

I should be ready to finish by this weekend! Thanks for the tips! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
At my local ACE this morning I saw “light duty” scotch pads (they were white). Is that what you are referring to? Or is there something more specific for “sanding” between coats?
 

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Cabinetmaker
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so many questions I am tired now LOL LOL
1. 220 is fine, wipe em off with a damp cloth to get rid of the dust and there is a "secret" reason for this also :}:}:}:}:} cant tell ya or else :}
after they dry resand 220 and blow dust off or a dry rag is fine.
2. between coats dats where the scotch brite comes in
3. 3 coats is just fine
4. scotch brite and then buff with old towel shhhhhhhhhhhhh
5. Nail setup is great
6. Thats what the poly is for LOL LOL nothing else needed

Yes I am a cabinetmaker
 

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Discussion Starter #7
so many questions I am tired now LOL LOL
1. 220 is fine, wipe em off with a damp cloth to get rid of the dust and there is a "secret" reason for this also :}:}:}:}:} cant tell ya or else :}
after they dry resand 220 and blow dust off or a dry rag is fine.
2. between coats dats where the scotch brite comes in
3. 3 coats is just fine
4. scotch brite and then buff with old towel shhhhhhhhhhhhh
5. Nail setup is great
6. Thats what the poly is for LOL LOL nothing else needed

Yes I am a cabinetmaker
Thanks again for the help! Will post pics next week when I get this thing done (or ASAP).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
All Done!!!

The finish is 3 coats of gloss Minwax brush-on poly finished with a final coat of Minwax spray-on satin poly. After it cured for 3-4 days I buffed it out with 0000 steel wool and Johnson’s wax. The result is a smooth finish that should play well with delicate yarns. The bottom of the swift has a layer of shelf liner cork for protection and anti-skidness.









Thanks for the help everyone! :thumbsup:
 
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