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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All, well I've started my first project few days ago. Plan is to build a bookcase for my nephew and neice who are expecting their first baby - it'll be a gift.

I found this 30 yr old armoire build in New Orleans - The owners were moving and getting rid of it for FREE. Its built with solid Cypress and larger than the bookcase I'm planning so I figured I'll give it a try. I took it all apart, removed all the nails, cleaned up the dust and cobwebs :) already.

Any suggestions before I start the project? I'm sharing the potential design below. I plan to stain all of it except the roof which will be painted. What kind of joint would you use to attach the roof to the sides?
Property Cabinetry Door Closet Wood
Wood Fixture Wood stain Hardwood Window
Bookcase Shelf Furniture Product Shelving
 

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The old armoire certainly had nice looking wood. I would attach roof to sides with dado.

I guess you could cut the top of the sides with the appropriate angle but that would not be as strong a joint.

george
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The old armoire certainly had nice looking wood. I would attach roof to sides with dado.

I guess you could cut the top of the sides with the appropriate angle but that would not be as strong a joint.

george
I imagine cutting a dado at an angle isn’t easy. I’ll have to YouTube that. I’m thinking it would be easier to cut the vertical side edge at an angle and cut a normal 90deg dado. Does that make sense?
 

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Smart and Cool
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I imagine cutting a dado at an angle isn’t easy. I’ll have to YouTube that. I’m thinking it would be easier to cut the vertical side edge at an angle and cut a normal 90deg dado. Does that make sense?
I wouldn't dado that joint, the picture you show is all butt joints, for that piece, they would be fine.

Nail/glue the shelves, nail or screw the top to the sides.

I would consider a dado for the back to inset into the cabinet, but again, it isn't necessary, the piece in the picture it is probably tacked on the back.
 

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Just because the one in the picture looks cheaply made I would not let that influence how I made it. Definitely no nails and be very sparing with screws.

That dado is not that difficult. You tilt the blades to angel needed. I would also dado the shelves.

George
 

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Smart and Cool
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Just because the one in the picture looks cheaply made I would not let that influence how I made it. Definitely no nails and be very sparing with screws.

That dado is not that difficult. You tilt the blades to angel needed. I would also dado the shelves.

George
He will need 3 angled for the top, and they will have to be stopped dados as the top over hangs the vertical pieces.

We agree that dados are the right way to do it, it's just a question of adapting to the skill level of the person building it.
 

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Smart and Cool
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I imagine cutting a dado at an angle isn’t easy. I’ll have to YouTube that. I’m thinking it would be easier to cut the vertical side edge at an angle and cut a normal 90deg dado. Does that make sense?
It won't when you draw it out, the dado has to be angled, if you cut it straight the sides of the dado would not have the same angle as the sides of the cabinet.
 

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It won't when you draw it out, the dado has to be angled, if you cut it straight the sides of the dado would not have the same angle as the sides of the cabinet.
The best and easiest and possibly only way to make angled dados is on a table saw or radial arm saw with the blades titled. I may have done it on my table saw long time ago....?
You can make a wedge shaped base for a router, but that's a whole 'nother thread.
 

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Smart and Cool
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The best and easiest and possibly only way to make angled dados is on a table saw or radial arm saw with the blades titled. I may have done it on my table saw long time ago....?
You can make a wedge shaped base for a router, but that's a whole 'nother thread.
I can't recall that I ever have, guess I could look through all of my old throat plates and see... :)
 

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I wouldn't have used a throat plate for mine, just 6 ft long boards for window "eye brows" for shade and rain deflection. I needed about 10 or so for casement windows on the South side of the house. Made 'em from Cedar. Stained 'em milk chocolate brown. Made an extra one. One failed in the joint, so I need to replace that one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just because the one in the picture looks cheaply made I would not let that influence how I made it. Definitely no nails and be very sparing with screws.

That dado is not that difficult. You tilt the blades to angel needed. I would also dado the shelves.

George
George, I had the same thoughts - The picture is mainly for a reference design. I'd like to make it as high quality as possible. If I Dado all the shelves and inset (dado) the back panel, would glue construction be strong enough? ( I would use screws in the back panel) The side and top panels are 3/4" thick solid wood. I think shelves are 7/8".

Sorry but I don't follow the 'blade tilt' comment. How would I get an angle dado like that? I tried to search on Youtube, couldn't find any such videos. How about a router, do they make a bit to make the angled dado?
 

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The dado is a stack of blades and chippers, so it would be the same as tilting the blade(s). When you adjust the bevel or tilt control on the side of the saw it will tilt the blade(s) over to as much as 45 degrees. The dado would be at what ever angle you set it to based on your design. All the other dados will be at 90 degrees to the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The dado is a stack of blades and chippers, so it would be the same as tilting the blade(s). When you adjust the bevel or tilt control on the side of the saw it will tilt the blade(s) over to as much as 45 degrees. The dado would be at what ever angle you set it to based on your design. All the other dados will be at 90 degrees to the surface.
Thanks, I recently bought a Delta 34-444 and it came with a dado stack - I've yet to use it. I'll give it a try tomorrow.
 

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You better get some knowledge before you jump right in using a dado. They take 4 to 5 times the "bite" of a single blade, so there's more resistance and more pushing force is required. There are chippers to properly arrange as well. Watch You Tube for instructions first:

Another reliable source here:
 

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Smart and Cool
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The OP posted that he purchased a "starter saw", which tells me he might not have a lot of time on a table saw.

Jumping right into a dado, and an angled dado at that, seems like a high risk situation.

OP, please be very, very careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the videos and safety precautions. I have owned a table saw for about 10 years, so generally aware of the risks. But no experience with dado stacks etc. Will definitely take it slow and practice on scrap pieces. I do have a good cross cut sled, which makes the work piece much more stable. Actually the saw isn't exactly a starter saw. Its a Delta 34-444 contractor saw - I consider my old direct drive craftsman with aluminum top a starter saw :)
 

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George, I had the same thoughts - The picture is mainly for a reference design. I'd like to make it as high quality as possible. If I Dado all the shelves and inset (dado) the back panel, would glue construction be strong enough? ( I would use screws in the back panel) The side and top panels are 3/4" thick solid wood. I think shelves are 7/8".

Sorry but I don't follow the 'blade tilt' comment. How would I get an angle dado like that? I tried to search on Youtube, couldn't find any such videos. How about a router, do they make a bit to make the angled dado?
Glue would be very strong. Good luck with the project.

Now is as good a time as any to learn how to use your dado set. There always has to be a first time.

George
 

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Let's talk about dados.

You stated you are going to stain all of it except the roof which will be painted.

You do realize the dados will be visible from the front if you do "through" dados? That's not exactly a demonstration of high quality, visually.

How do you plan to address that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Let's talk about dados.

You stated you are going to stain all of it except the roof which will be painted.

You do realize the dados will be visible from the front if you do "through" dados? That's not exactly a demonstration of high quality, visually.

How do you plan to address that?
I was thinking about that too. I would cut a 1 inch step in front of the shelf and stop the dado 1 nch away from the front. Don’t know the technical term for it, but it should hide the dado slots. Where I stop the dado cuts I would have to chisel out or route the area to make it fit square shelf. I’m guessing that might not be easy.

I would love to build this without any nails or screws if possible (except the back piece). But that may be too ambitious 😄
 
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