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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All -
This is my first time posting and it's about my first real project. I've done small woodworking projects here and there, but they were always primitive (e.g all nails and screws). My wife wants a farmhouse dining table, and rather than do the whole thing with pocket screw joinery like some guides suggest, I want to do it with some honest to goodness joinery.

I've got the whole table figured out in terms of what joints I'm going to make and use (mortise and tenon for legs, stretchers, and apron and I'm going to lap the top).

However to make this table a little unique, I'd like to do something special with the tops of the legs. I'd like to bring the tops of the legs up through the table top so that the tops of the legs are flush with the table top. However if I do this, will I be running into problems with the top expanding laterally and the legs not giving expansion room? I'm afraid of the top buckling or the apron getting pulled out of the mortise.

Thanks for any/all help!
 

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its all wood, so if there is a spanner between the legs, it should expand right along with the table top, so it all moves together.

With that said, I wonder how much expansion and contraction an indoor table has in an air conditioned enviroment.
 

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Might I suggest putting the legs on the very outer corners, so that the outter edge of the leg, makes the actual corner of the table? This way you have two sides that are not bound by the table top, and it should allow more than enough movement.

Simon
 

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its all wood, so if there is a spanner between the legs, it should expand right along with the table top, so it all moves together.

With that said, I wonder how much expansion and contraction an indoor table has in an air conditioned enviroment.
Unless the AC unit has a built in humidity control, youll probably still see some movement. Its usually moisture that does it, not temperature. As far as the table goes, workbenches have been built that exact way for centuries. Should be fine mate
 

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Discussion Starter #6
As I see it the apron grain across the ends will be running opposite that of the top boards so they will expand and contract more than the apron.
That's a much better way of explaining exactly what I'm concerned about. But it sounds from the replies like things will work out.

Thanks everyone! Time to get some lumber tonight!
 

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That's a much better way of explaining exactly what I'm concerned about. But it sounds from the replies like things will work out.

Thanks everyone! Time to get some lumber tonight!
The problem that I pointed out is that wood expands more sideways than length wise. If the legs extend through the top the apron across the end will be holding the legs from expanding with the top, something will have to give.

Best advice I can give is to take advice given in here by some with a grain of salt, I think but I am not sure but I am going to reply anyway.:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The problem that I pointed out is that wood expands more sideways than length wise. If the legs extend through the top the apron across the end will be holding the legs from expanding with the top, something will have to give.

Best advice I can give is to take advice given in here by some with a grain of salt, I think but I am not sure but I am going to reply anyway.:laughing:
OK I hear ya - so what if I used a sliding dowel on that end aprons, similar to what some plans show for the bread board, so they have a 1/2" or so of play? Like this: http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/joinery/breadboard/
 
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