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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, stumbled across this forum this week while searching for a cure to some sanding swirls I got on my latest refinish.

Found my answer fast and started getting lost in the finishing section.

Live in MN, started refinishing a few gun stocks in high school, took a break and been doing tables, etc that I have found for cheap the last few years.

After looking around the site I do believe I can get some questions answered here so I will let fly.

I have done two pieces that I have no idea what kind of wood I was working with.

This one the best I have heard from others is birch but I'm not 100%

These are pics after I redid it all.






These are pre shots


 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
And this one I really have no idea. I'd really like to know because there is a front piece that I haven't redone yet as it had on piece missing that was just replaced with pine. I'd love to make a new piece to replace the cheap repair and get the front done but I haven't because I don't know what to use.

I have shown this piece to contractors and hobby wood workers. I even sent the front panel to a custom cabinet shop and they just said to use birch or maple for a close match.

Not sure on the age of the item, it looked and smelled old. Wood was pretty hard, unable to dent it with a thumbnail.

Cleaned up



And a few after I finished. The grain really didn't show up until I put on the stain.










 

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Welcome!
I too have done more than my share of refinishing. First table with the art deco look--might be golden oak, maybe of English origin--seen lots of stuff like that at container auctions that came from England. Not sure of the others, even with highres screen--it's just not like touching it. Pine usually has open grain, oak &birch not. (should be more comment coming from others shortly)
Not sure about the top in last 2 or 3 pics, but looks like there's more work to do for a water(or other) mark,plus some sanding or stripping to even out the color. The darkness implies age to me b/c they used such dark stains that period either for mourning (like Queen Anne) or cuz they didn't have to sand so much? And yes I dabble in antiques too.
Dave H
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks Cuerodoc. I cleaned up that last piece as best I could with stripper and sanding and put the dark stain on to help cover any blemishes I couldn't get.

I bought them both at local junk/antique/flea market type deals. The smaller piece looked like and was priced like it was drug from the barn corner after years of sitting. Bigger table I just bought because I loved the legs and at the end of the day the guy hadn't sold it and honored the verbal price he told me which was much better than the sticker price on it.

Not the best pics of either so that doesn't help. Harsh garage lights and a phone camera or low light in the house and same phone.
 
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