Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
I don't have a planer and I will need to thickness a panel, 17" x 16" using hand planes. How was your first experience taking a panel down with hand planes?

The panel is a glue up of maple and cherry that is s2s 4/4 right now and I need it to be roughly 1/2". I expect that I"ll probably miss the 1/2" mark. I expect many errors :laughing:.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,591 Posts
sounds like Woodshop 101

So, having no thickness planer.... I would use a circular saw or the table saw, even a router, to make multiple kerfs across the grain on the back side of the panel about 3/8" deep and about 3/4" apart. This will allow you to knock out the chunks netween the kerfs and remove most of the material more quickly than by hand planing it away. It will give you a reference for the depth as well. Hold your plane at an angle to the grain, skewed, and have at it.

Of course, tune up the plane blade and polish and wax the sole before starting. :yes:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/push-pull-your-plane-55671/

 
  • Like
Reactions: tc65

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
First, I'd make sure that one side of the panel is flat. If not, that is your first step.

Second, I'd use a marking gauge all around the panel so you have a reference line for your final thickness on all sides.

Third, even though I've never thought of it before (also never had to remove that much before) I'd follow Woodnthings suggestion of making multiple kerfs to remove the bulk of the material. Great idea to save lots of time!

Next, I'd use a fore plane to remove more waste. Mine is a SB #5 with a radius blade. Work diagonally across the board, and do not try to cut all the way down to the line, stay just above it.

Then it would be on to a jointer plane to flatten everything out and finally a smoother to finish.

It sounds like more work than it really is. Once you've gone through the process you'll be amazed how quickly and accurately you can thickness a board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
909 Posts
Did you check the grain direction when you glued them up? If not, you may want a card or cabinet scraper, too, as there will be tearout.
 

·
In History is the Future
Joined
·
6,423 Posts
Hi All,
I don't have a planer and I will need to thickness a panel, 17" x 16" using hand planes. How was your first experience taking a panel down with hand planes?

The panel is a glue up of maple and cherry that is s2s 4/4 right now and I need it to be roughly 1/2". I expect that I"ll probably miss the 1/2" mark. I expect many errors :laughing:.
What planes do you have at your disposal?
 

·
In History is the Future
Joined
·
6,423 Posts
I have a working 4 and 5. I also have a 6 and 7, but they are Currently being rehabbed.
This brings something to mind -did you ask me for a fore plane iron a while back?

My suggestion would be a heavily cambered iron (fore plane) in the jack set light to rough flatten one side. Jointed next with the 7 (jointer). Use winding sticks to check for flat.

Marking gauge from reference jointed side. Then the fore plane set aggressively to remove waste down to 1/8" over desire thickness. Then the jointer again. Additional smoothing can be done after the fact with a smoother / scraper / scraper plane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I guess I can't say I checked the grain. I put the best looking faces up.

Did you check the grain direction when you glued them up? If not, you may want a card or cabinet scraper, too, as there will be tearout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I think I did ask for a fore iron a while back. No worries, I forgot about it. :laughing:

I do have a 40 scrub plane but it's in the same boat as the 6 and 7. I have a queue of planes that need work. :) Cabinetman thanks for post the video about the block planes; I have a bunch that need to be tuned up. Well, maybe only one or two. I'll probably sell the others.

Besides cleaning the dirt off of the six I haven't done much with it. The seven is all out of whack, and will take a good bit of work.

I like the table saw idea but I can only run it on the weekends. I get home too late in the evenings and hand tools upset the family and neighbours less.

This brings something to mind -did you ask me for a fore plane iron a while back?

My suggestion would be a heavily cambered iron (fore plane) in the jack set light to rough flatten one side. Jointed next with the 7 (jointer). Use winding sticks to check for flat.

Marking gauge from reference jointed side. Then the fore plane set aggressively to remove waste down to 1/8" over desire thickness. Then the jointer again. Additional smoothing can be done after the fact with a smoother / scraper / scraper plane.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Did you check the grain direction when you glued them up? If not, you may want a card or cabinet scraper, too, as there will be tearout.
Ya...I just today realized I mixed up some grain directions on the glue up of my table top. There was no shortage of choice words that came out of my mouth when I got a 1/16" tear out right out the gate.
 

·
In History is the Future
Joined
·
6,423 Posts
There ain't much to a scrub plane be it a Stanley 40, 40-1/2 or similar or a woody.

Cleaning the dirt off and sharpening the iron is about all it needs. The soles don't need to be fettled, the mouths don't need work the plane doesn't need to be pretty. Sharpen and go with it until you have time to make it pretty - if you so desire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
There ain't much to a scrub plane be it a Stanley 40, 40-1/2 or similar or a woody.

Cleaning the dirt off and sharpening the iron is about all it needs. The soles don't need to be fettled, the mouths don't need work the plane doesn't need to be pretty. Sharpen and go with it until you have time to make it pretty - if you so desire.
The scrub plane was in pretty good condition. Some dirt but the blade was already sharp :blink:. Wow :eek: I practiced on a scrap of pine. I took half the thickness off in less than two minutes. I think this will be a little easier than I had originally thought.
 

·
In History is the Future
Joined
·
6,423 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
It's a little intimidating when I first marked it out.

ForumRunner_20131121_212402.jpg

After an hour of sweat, it's getting their.

ForumRunner_20131121_212415.jpg

I don't feel so bad about skipping the gym today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Kinda disappointing. The opposite side warped after the planing. The center is a good 1/8" higher than the edges. I guess I should have planed the boards before I did the glue up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
909 Posts
I suppose it might've been better to take an equal amount of each face... maybe take some thin shavings off the back and then let it equalize for a week or so and see if it flattens back out. My uncle-in-law gave us a cutting board he made of cherry, maple, and walnut and that thing will cup significantly if left wet, but if I rewet it on the bowed side and let it set it straightens back out good as new overnight.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top