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Discussion Starter #1
So I started my first cutting board yesterday. Cut all the boards down and and planed them down to the same size.

Tonight I glued them together. First thing I need to do is buy way more clamps only two sets not nearly enough. I am guessing at least two more sets. I come from more of a construction background big difference to say the least lol.

See how the rest works out in the next few days.

How many sets of clamps do you all use when doing cutting boards?

Also do you ever try make two boards out of one glue up?

I used 4 ft sections of board to hopefully get two complete boards when I am done.
 

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I use a jorgenson parallel bar clamp every 6 inches or so...and I regularly have made large glue ups and cut into multiple pieces.
 

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I make one board at a time.

I like to clamp the pieces side-to-side and other clamps to hold the pieces to a flat reference surface, which is a granite slab.

If I do not clamp all around I get things shifting and then lose some thickness to clean this up.

I have not been successful gluing too many pieces at one time. Something always moves.

I now glue two pieces at a time into sub-assemblies, then two sub-assemblies, etc.

Takes more time, but for me this is a hobby.

You either need more clamps, or buy or make some clamping cauls.

A link in case you have not heard of a caul. Easy to make.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=67309&cat=1,43838
 

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I've made 100's of cutting boards. I use 2 clamps on bottom, 1 on top like Tom. I usually don't do longer glue ups and cut them down later unless I'm making smaller cheese boards.
 

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Just finished this cutting board a couple of weeks ago... It's 18x24... I made it in two glueups (halves) so I could control movement better, and be able to run the halves thru the planer.... I use 2 bottom pipe clamps, and two on top... Sent to y'all offen' a iPad thing......
 

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For the first glue up I use 3 clamps on the bottom and two sets of cauls between the two outside clamps. Keeps things pretty flat. I usually start with boards as close to 1" thick if I can.

I do the second glue up in two stages. then one last glue up.

Next step is the drum sander to flatten, wet the board, let it sit overnight, sand with 220 and repeat once more, then rout the edges, square up the board and viola. Mineral oil, two saturated coats left to stand over night.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Planed it down last night looks pretty good so far. Dont think I will have enough usable wood to make two so probably going to make one really thick one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
did all the cross cuts yesterday after I built my first sled. tonight glued it up and clamped it up. Used more clamps this time and a much smaller glue up. I am not sure I like the way it looks lol but it was my first time so I didnt want to use expensive wood to start. Might look better after I sand it down, router the edge and oil it up. Hopefully finish it this week.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Finally had time to finish my first board hopefully post pics later.

Did burn out my belt sander in the process, it was a very old hand me down.

So any recommedations for a new one?
 

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Finally had time to finish my first board hopefully post pics later.

Did burn out my belt sander in the process, it was a very old hand me down.

So any recommedations for a new one?
We love to see pictures. :yes:

If you burned out a belt sander, you had too much to take off. I would look at getting some hand planes rather than a belt sander.

A couple of sharp hand planes would likely have got the board smoother faster than belt sanding.

Another consideration for a power tool method to flatten the board is a sled for a router. Also faster than a belt sander.

A number of threads on making these. Fairly straightforward.

One example.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/you-dont-think-its-big-do-you-42854/
 

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Discussion Starter #13
No it was a sorry old sander I had it pretty smooth before I started. It was at least 30 plus years old lots of miles. I wasnt even pushing on it just stop spinning and started stinking up the joint lol.

I was only smoothing it for maybe 5-10 minutes on each side then got out my bosch orbital to finish it off.

I was looking at belt sanders knowing this one was going to give out soon any ideas?
 

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Just got done glueing up an end grain board and I used 2 parallel clamps and 5 bar clamps I also used 2 sets of cauls to the mix to keep everything lined up and flat. All I need is a little bit of time with the orbital sander and it's good to go.

For such a simple process it took me about 3 dozen of them to get the glue ups the way I like them.:thumbsup:
 

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Looks nice! I really like it.

About the belt sander. To me its kinda a useless tool. I honestly can't remeber the last time I even used mine. I guess it was before I got a planer I used it to smooth our rough boards... I was quite the rookie back then lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I have a decent planer (Model #: DW735X) but I was under the impression to never ever run end grain through planer. So after you do the final glue up how do you smooth out the rough edges?

I used a belt sander for a few minutes on each side then orbital till it was completely smooth.
 

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No I wouldn't run end grain through a planer that a tearout disaster waiting to happen. Ideally a drum sanders is the toll to use. I usually use cauldron and try to keep ot as flat as possible. Smooth any unlevelness with my no.4 then my ros to make is perfect and pretty. I understand hand planes aren't for everyone. And using them on end grain they need to be very very sharp. Also if you are going to run through the edge of a board clamp a sacrificial piece to the edge to keep it from tearing out.
 

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I take my end grain boards to a local cabinet maker. They charge me $5 to run them through their wide belt sander. I won't risk my safety or my planer.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I would like to get a drum sander but those are quite pricey and I am very new to wood working so that isnt an option quite yet but I have been looking into them quite a bit.
 
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