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Discussion Starter #1
Saw this somewhere and thought I'd try it.
DSCN0461[1].jpg
 

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Well it looks like it worked. I'd sure be interested in a tutorial on that or a description of the glue up.
 

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DST said:
Well it looks like it worked. I'd sure be interested in a tutorial on that or a description of the glue up.
Agreed.

I like the design. Very cool. Is that Purpleheart & oak?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A learning experience for me!

A long read here. I didn't mean to make it so long but there are several things that can go wrong that might help in making YOUR bowl better than mine.
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Here's the video I went by for this particular bowl. It is simply well taken pictures with no chat. Watch, then read the tips I have on the process, and what I learned to do/or not to do.
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First thing, all boards must be planed smooth.
Boards #1 and 5 MUST be planed the same thickness so the corners of the squares inside the bowl will match. (Mine were a little off)
Boards #2 and 4 MUST be the same thickness, same reason, but not necessarily the same thickness as #1 and 5.
Board #3 (middle) can be any thickness.
The width of the boards must be slightly less than the cutting height of your TS blade. Mine is 3".
The thickness of the lamination will determine the diameter of the of the bowl. In my case about 7". (3-1/2 + 3-1/2)
The length of the boards should be sufficient to allow enough material against the miter gauge for the last 45 degree cut. In my case 28" was BEARLY enough. 32" would have been safer.
The lamination must be cleaned up. Putty knife, belt sander, etc. as best you can, then run it through the planer for a good clean-up.
(I replaced my new planer blades with some old ones for this process, and lost a small piece of my left index finger doing so. Another lesson learned the hard way.)
It may be best to use a backer board for cutting the 45's, as there is a little tear-out which will affect the very center of the bowl.
Cut your 1st 45, flip the lamination and set a stop so the saw blade centers on the zenith of the triangle being cut.
Soften the edges of your 4 pieces a little and start glue up.
Glue just 2 pieces together, and glue the other 2 pieces separately.
After drying take the 2 assemblies to the belt sander. (40 grit is good) to flatten the faces for the next glue-up.
When the square is dry, clean 1 side good on the BS and it's ready to mount on the face plate. I made a sacrificial oak face plate (1-1/2x4)
screwed it to the steel faceplate and glued the whole assembly to the bowl blank. The rest is up to you.
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Impossible to get a clamp on this shape so here's what I did. The one piece is not ready for final glue-up. I just put it in for the picture.
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. DSCN0462[1].jpg
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.The bottom of the triangle may or may not be straight. More important to align the corners of the inner pieces. It can be flattened later on the belt sander.

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. DSCN0464[1].jpg
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I hope this wasn't too boring and that you can gain by my errors.

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Discussion Starter #13
2nd and 3rd attempt

Finding most of my errors on the 1st one, I've got another similar going. Faceplate is glued-up, waiting for tomorrow.
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DSCN0465[1].jpg
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Venturing into unfathomed waters I figured to make a bigger bowl with the same procedure, but using 7 boards. The laminated boards are 5-3/4" thick, making for an 11 " +/- diameter bowl. Should be done in a few days. Stay tuned.
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DSCN0466[1].jpg
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One downfall is that there is a lot of wasted wood, from the cutting the 45's and turning out the center of the bowl. Could get expensive using high dollar material.
 

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Mary first try looking like a failure even with your tips. I had 5 boards at 29" and figured I would be safe but at 5 1/4" thick I can't get 4 45 degree cuts in that length.
Now I just need to come up with an idea to use this glue up.

Poor planning.... Grrrr
 

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Discussion Starter #16
!st try usually turns out the worst

Never mind I used a board stretcher and got it fixed. Must be too late for measuring.
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Can you post a pic of the board stretcher?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My 4th bowl (11") and problems

After laminating the 7 boards, cutting them at 45*, I glued 2 pieces together, aligning the inner corners closely. Another problem. After unclamping I found the opposite side was misaligned a little.:huh: I dreamed about this problem last night and come to the conclusion that the individual boards were not perfectly perpendicular to the assembly table at glue-up. Or perhaps the clamping pulled them awry some. Any way I'll make arrangements for the "bad" side to be the inside of the bowl so that the misalignment should decrease as I go down toward the bottom. Or not. Also I plan today to figure a way to use this procedure without so much wasted wood. That should be in my next post.
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Perhaps Mr phinds can shed some light on this for me.:notworthy:
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DSCN0477.jpg
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DSCN0481.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Perhaps my last attempt using this procedure

I've made 5 bowls using this procedure, most of which are attractive, even with the minor misalignments. My major problem is the wasted wood. Not just scrap, but wasted. I can't use much of what's left over. Not to mention the 10 cubic feet of shavings on the floor. The first pic shows my last bowl at around 10 o'clock, a walnut bowl and three other attempts using this procedure. The second pic shows some of the leftovers, most of which are useless. Until I can find a way to save material, I'll not do any more like this.
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DSCN0565.jpg
DSCN0566.jpg
 

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Glue some of the scraps for smaller bowls. Or bottle stoppers, small handles....or box em up and send em to me, I'll find some use for them ;-)
 
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