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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finishing and sanding have to be the worst part of any project....
 

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:laughing::laughing::laughing: But its one of the things that needs to be done tho so might as well have fun with it
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm trying to match a tv stand to the small table that was made with the same wood, and stained with the same stain. Only my brother in law stained the table, and I'm trying to stain the tv stand, and I can't get the colors to match.
 

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Pain in the A$$
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ryan50hrl said:
I'm trying to match a tv stand to the small table that was made with the same wood, and stained with the same stain. Only my brother in law stained the table, and I'm trying to stain the tv stand, and I can't get the colors to match.
How old is the stain? That can make a big difference.

Mark
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So I can get the color to match, but then if I use a wipe laquer over it the color comes off.....I have the feeling I'm going to have to spray
 

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Pain in the A$$
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A few months shouldn't matter.

ryan50hrl said:
So I can get the color to match, but then if I use a wipe laquer over it the color comes off.....I have the feeling I'm going to have to spray
Is the lacquer a solvent-base done? With some oil-based stains, if you wipe on a solvent-based topcoat the solvent "reactivates" the stain and it wipes off even though it was dry.

Mark
 

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Stain is kinda fickled. You can stain a piece in winter and it will be lighter than using the same can in summer. Knowing what stain that was used is a big plus. It might just be a matter of thinning the stain to make it work. Just a couple of months unless the stain is seperated it shouldn't be considered old. If you could post a picture we might be able to give you a clue how to match the color.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here's the color I'm trying to match....I built the table and my BIL finished it....the stain was 2 coats of sherwin Williams chestnut stain. The part that's odd for me is that the first coat soaks in quickly, and looks a golden color....nothing like this finished color. The second coat gets the desired color, but once I try to brush on lacquer were right back to the original color. Now, if I can find a stain that doesn't need multiple coats to replicate this color that's fine, as these pieces won't be in the same house.
 

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It's generally not a good idea to put two coats of stain on. Sometimes you can put enough stain on the surface that when you finish over it the finish adheres to the stain instead of the wood and it will peal off. I think when you brush the lacquer on the solvent in the brushing lacquer is washing off the additional stain. If the color isn't dark enough you might consider going to the next darker shade, SW 3115-k Bistro Walnut. If you don't have so much stain on the surface that it might cause an adhesion problem you could spray the lacquer on and it wouldn't rub the pigment off. A safer means of supplimenting color is to use a dye stain mixed with alcohol.
 

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Oil base stains work well with oak. It's best to start with the right color, derived from making samples, and then topcoating the samples to see what the final finish will look like. One application of oil base stain works best. You could though use an alcohol or water based dye and apply more than once to get the right color.

Using lacquer as a wipe on did act as a solvent. Lacquer should be sprayed on if possible. A waterbase polyurethane would also work very well for a finish.

The time a stain sits in a can, or the time of the year its applied would have very little consequence to match old work. The wood used for the samples could vary that much to yield either good or bad results. The wood itself can vary, which can become obvious when stained.






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The finish is what gets the oohs and ahhs when folks look at a project. The joinery is generally ignored except by fellow wood workers.

The point is to learn how to finish properly if you plan to "show case" your work.
 
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