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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon. Have just completed a fairly large segmented vase (11" w, 15"h) that will be used for dry flower arrangements. My question: will I have to somehow finish the inside to keep the drying process even? The vase opening is 1-1/4" so I could pour a finish inside and shake it around till it covers if I need to. Any thoughts on this? It is soft maple/walnut.

Thank you,

Bandman
 

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Uhm ... I can't tell if this means that you glued up and turned a segmented piece using wood that isn't dry ...

I'm no expert, but I believe that glue joints between two different green woods are unlikely to survive the drying process. I hope somebody corrects me (or I misunderstood your post), that'd be a lot of work to lose.
 

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I'm assuming it's dry wood. No you don't need to finish the inside unless you just want to. What I often do on segmented things that resemble a vase is to turn it like I'm turning 2 bowls. Sand and finish the inside and outside. Then I put them together ( I turn a matching tenon and rebate that's very tiny to help alignment) Then all I have to do is touch up the joint, sand and finish it. That way it's finished on the inside and outside to the same level.
The wood movement due to moisture will be fairly even without finishing the inside because there is more air movement outside thus it tries to evaporate more from there and the finish will slow it down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good afternoon. Have just completed a fairly large segmented vase (11" w, 15"h) that will be used for dry flower arrangements. My question: will I have to somehow finish the inside to keep the drying process even? The vase opening is 1-1/4" so I could pour a finish inside and shake it around till it covers if I need to. Any thoughts on this? It is soft maple/walnut.

Thank you,

Bandman
Thanks to all who offered suggestions. The wood is kiln dried. The only reason I was asking is because the top of the vase is fairly flat 7' across (walnut w/ maple strips between the segments) and the last time I did one like this the top started to separate at the joints and I thought it might be because the inside of the vase was not finished. It was pointed out to me by a friend that "maybe" the contrasting strips in the last one were cut with the grain instead of end cuts. I would love to post pictures of my work, but my woodworking skill are far more advanced than my computer skills. I promise I will be posting some pictures within the next few months!
 
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