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I am building a wine console for a client and I need to match my stain to some existing furniture, I was thinking of just getting a tinted sanding sealer to spray it then finish it with a top coat, anyone ever have experience just toning to the color? Let me know, I'm curious for your input on it, I am going from maple to cherry if that makes a difference.

Furniture Table Wood Desk Machine


This is one of the pieces it still needs a door and drawer and stemware hangers.
 

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Using a tinted sealer removes the ability to adjust your color. Starting with Maple, you may want to use a conditioner to help minimize blotching, and then a dye stain, or an oil base stain, and then a top coat. Shortcutting leaves you no options. Once the sealer is applied, any further colorization will be hindered.

Using a dye after a conditioner, you can increase the intensity if necessary. Make samples with taking your samples out to the final finish. Topcoating will give the finish a different appearance, than just judging from when it's just stained. Make notes on the samples of what ratios were used, or any mix info. You can do some toning by adding a tint to the topcoat (film finish spray), if necessary. That's used to create some uniformity in the finish.







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In order to match existing furniture you need as much as possible to finish the furniture the same way the existing furniture was done. If the existing furniture was finished with an oil stain and clear coated and you spraying tinted sealer on the new furniture it will have a gel stain appearance to it and look completely different. The easiest thing for you to do if it's an oil stain and clear coat is pre-treat some wood samples with a 50/50 mix of linseed oil and mineral spirits and take them with a sample of the finish to a paint store such as sherwin williams and have them mix the stain for you. They can take their wood classics stain and add colorants to it to match the finish. You can do it yourself but you would have to purchase several bottles of colorant such as cal-tint to mix it. It's just takes a lot of tinkering and testing on samples to match a color. If you could post of picture of the color you want one of us might be able to give you more specific info on matching the color.
 
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