Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello one and all 馃憢馃檪

Long time follower...1st time poster. Hopefully one of you lovely bunch can help me figure out what to do.

Image attached shows these long wooden floor boards in an old apartment in Berlin. Now...they were heavily waxed, but that has now been removed via the medium of heavy disc sanding.

Here's the question...what shall I coat them with to keep them looking fresh and not to bring out too much of the finish? They're a little damaged by time and oiling would bring out the details of wear and tear that ideally I would like to avoid.

Any help is appreciated, so TIA for any answers that may be provided.

Cheers 馃嵒馃榾
Wood Sunlight Flooring Rectangle Floor
 

Registered
Joined
638 Posts
Anything you put on it will give it the wet look. An oil based spar urethane finish, or similar, will likely yellow, to some extent, over time. Here in the States, I've used Varathane water based Crystal floor finish to achieve results you seem to want. I'm not a pro floor finisher, so as a DIYer, the Varathane worked just fine for me.

It appears there are some pretty wide cracks between the boards. Do you plan to fill (*****) those cracks? If so, what do you plan to ***** them with? Ages ago, boat builders used linen for chinking. Jute rope/twine has been used by DIYers. Each is flexible to accommodate expansion and contraction of the wood. I have another suggestion for chinking material, though I've never tried it.... upholstery piping cord or welt cording. It comes in various diameters, made of cotton (flexible), is stainable and take a finish. I would think it would be just as appropriate as other forms of materials for chinking a wide-crack floor application. A jute rope/twine type cord may be a better natural color match for your boards, though. Any kind of chinking will be a tedious task.

Sonny
 

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@Sonny thank you for your extensive reply...appreciated 馃憤

I shall see if I can find some Varathane or something similar cause it sounds like the kind of thing I am looking for. Obviously will spot test it 1st ;)

And...yes, there are some wide cracks in there. Now that you have mentioned some twine or rope, I shall do that as well. I really like that idea too.

Thank you for your reply 100% 鉁
 

Registered
Joined
638 Posts
As to chinking, you might want to make a tool. I'm an upholsterer and also do caning. For pressed in cane, I made this tool for pressing the spline into the groove, hence similar to pressing a filler into floor cracks. The narrow end is not square cornered, but rounded. A square cornered tool would indent into the spline, but the rounded corners allow for walking the tool down and into the groove and the spline (floor crack chinking) is pressed into the groove (crack). The butt end of the tool is big enough to be comfortable to hand pressing, yet robust enough for hammering the chinking firmly into the floor cracks. By walking the chinking into the cracks, you are likely better able to control the chinking process, similarly as controlling the pressed in spline when caning.

Sonny
Food Office ruler Font Rectangle Ruler

Ruler Cloud Handwriting Wood Office ruler
 

Premium Member
Joined
3,701 Posts
Don鈥榯 you all over there use a lot of hard wax oil?

Polyurethane is pretty standard here.

I would consult your local experts they have more knowledge of products.
 

Registered
Joined
2 Posts
Loba 2K Invisible Protect (made in Germany)
Second this. A friend used it in his home, and it looks great several years later. I used Bona Traffic HD on a kitchen floor (reclaimed maple boards), and while it looked great initially and has not and will not yellow, it hasn't held up well at all.
 

Registered
Joined
28,574 Posts
l wouldn't assume the wax is gone by sanding it. Sanding tends to just rub the wax in. It really needed to be chemically stripped before sanding. From where you are I would use some type of oil finish or wax to insure you didn't have an adhesion issue with a film finish. .If you do decide on a film finish you might make sure there is no open flame or spark in the house and wash the floor with acetone frequently changing rags before you put the finish on.
 

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Don鈥榯 you all over there use a lot of hard wax oil?

Polyurethane is pretty standard here.

I would consult your local experts they have more knowledge of products.
Yeah...loads of hard wax. Removed it cause it looked ****ing horrible :)

Fancy something a bit fresher now. Cheers for your reply...appreciated
 

Registered
Joined
198 Posts
I refinished similar floors in my own home which were originally waxed with the intention of tung oiling them. After testing out one small section, the tung oil brought out and highlighted existing stains which weren鈥檛 visibly apparent after sanding. As a result I ended up just using paste wax. The wax I used as with most any wax develops water spots which are easily buffed out with Scotch-brite. One advantage of wax is the floors are easily spot repairable鈥ery easy to steam out dents and touch up with wax. I also think the gaps add character.

Image.jpeg

Image_1.jpeg

Image_2.jpeg
 

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
l wouldn't assume the wax is gone by sanding it. Sanding tends to just rub the wax in. It really needed to be chemically stripped before sanding. From where you are I would use some type of oil finish or wax to insure you didn't have an adhesion issue with a film finish. .If you do decide on a film finish you might make sure there is no open flame or spark in the house and wash the floor with acetone frequently changing rags before you put the finish on.
Safety third ;)
 

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I refinished similar floors in my own home which were originally waxed with the intention of tung oiling them. After testing out one small section, the tung oil brought out and highlighted existing stains which weren鈥檛 visibly apparent after sanding. As a result I ended up just using paste wax. The wax I used as with most any wax develops water spots which are easily buffed out with Scotch-brite. One advantage of wax is the floors are easily spot repairable鈥ery easy to steam out dents and touch up with wax. I also think the gaps add character.

View attachment 440254
View attachment 440256
View attachment 440255
A fine job there...nicely done 馃憤
 

Registered
Joined
198 Posts
l wouldn't assume the wax is gone by sanding it. Sanding tends to just rub the wax in. It really needed to be chemically stripped before sanding. From where you are I would use some type of oil finish or wax to insure you didn't have an adhesion issue with a film finish. .If you do decide on a film finish you might make sure there is no open flame or spark in the house and wash the floor with acetone frequently changing rags before you put the finish on.
I was told the fire pictured in the following link on one of my former client鈥檚 homes was due to solvents igniting when painters were chemically cleaning & dewaxing wood..

NY Fire News 鈥 East Hampton Fire Department Battles Fire at Historic Home
 

Registered
Joined
28,574 Posts
I was told the fire pictured in the following link on one of my former client鈥檚 homes was due to solvents igniting when painters were chemically cleaning & dewaxing wood..

NY Fire News 鈥 East Hampton Fire Department Battles Fire at Historic Home
Yes, acetone is highly flammable is why I recommended to make sure there is no open flame in the house. You hear horror stories all the time someone mopping a floor with a solvent with a water heater in the next room. You have to use your head when working with flammable solvents. If you let the fumes build up even flipping a light switch can create enough spark to set it off.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top