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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello All,

I'm new to the site. I also got here because I have a problem and would appreciate your feedback. I am contracting a kitchen remodel (my own) and in the process subbed out the re-finishing of some high quality cabinetry. I found a furniture re-finisher in town sent a sample for them to do and was pleased. They took the time and did a good job of sanding and applyiong the new finsh.

I took the entire job to them and when it arrived, the island unit which has large surfaces looked blotchy so I had them take it back. I found out the stain was sprayer applied which was disappointing. Is this the normal? I always hand apply stain for my projects and have had excellent results.

The second problem which is more troubling is that they dip stripped my raised panel oak doors. When I got them back I found they have things rolling around when turned. Did some research found out they are space balls which keep the raised panel centered in the stiles and crosses and prevent panel rattle when the door is closed.
Question-are the doors now ruined ? Is there any restoration of this panel cushioning?

Thanks for your feedback!

arh
 

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Hello All,

I'm new to the site. I also got here because I have a problem and would appreciate your feedback. I am contracting a kitchen remodel (my own) and in the process subbed out the re-finishing of some high quality cabinetry. I found a furniture re-finisher in town sent a sample for them to do and was pleased. They took the time and did a good job of sanding and applyiong the new finsh.

I took the entire job to them and when it arrived, the island unit which has large surfaces looked blotchy so I had them take it back. I found out the stain was sprayer applied which was disappointing. Is this the normal? I always hand apply stain for my projects and have had excellent results.

The second problem which is more troubling is that they dip stripped my raised panel oak doors. When I got them back I found they have things rolling around when turned. Did some research found out they are space balls which keep the raised panel centered in the stiles and crosses and prevent panel rattle when the door is closed.
Question-are the doors now ruined ? Is there any restoration of this panel cushioning?

Thanks for your feedback!

arh
Well first of all if they knowingly put oak doors in a dip tank with sodium hydroxide more commonly known as lye they don't know what they are doing. I bet the grain has opened up to where you can stand a steel rule up in the cracks. It certainly has turned a green gray. If this is what was done the doors are ruined. The chemical has so deeply penetrated into the wood you will never be able to sand it or bleach it out. Sometimes though a refinisher will use what is called a flow over tank. It has sides on it that are only about a foot high which uses a different chemical that doesn't ruin the wood. If that is the case then the doors are salvagable. More than likely the finish prevented the rattle. All you would have to do is center the panel in the door and put a very small brad on a angel in the center of the panel at top and bottom so it stays in place. Having the nail in the center will allow for expansion and the panel is not suppose to be glued in. Then normal finishing will fill what is left. A picture would help tell what remover was used.

I generally spray an oil stain when I'm finishing cabinets however if a person isn't careful they can spray too much of an area before it is wiped off. I don't spray an area more the 3 ft. sq. before I wipe it off. If they did leave the stain on too long they should have known they could wipe the cabinet down with lacquer thinner to remove the excess stain. I assume this is what you mean by it blotching. Generally oak isn't a wood prone to blotch but this could have happened if they didn't properly sand the cabinet first.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for your reply Steve.

Yesterday we moved the cabinets into the house from the garage. When we got them under better lighting it is evident that the entire job is botched up. Even on small surfaces there is signs of uneven stain color like is was sprayed and not rubbed to even it out. Generally you can tell when there is uneven color due to wood grain but this is uneveness caused by spray pattern. Im affraid that after I have paid them $8,000. that there will be little incentive for them to do the job properly and I dont' think they have the ability to anyway.
 

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Thank you for your reply Steve.

Yesterday we moved the cabinets into the house from the garage. When we got them under better lighting it is evident that the entire job is botched up. Even on small surfaces there is signs of uneven stain color like is was sprayed and not rubbed to even it out. Generally you can tell when there is uneven color due to wood grain but this is uneveness caused by spray pattern. Im affraid that after I have paid them $8,000. that there will be little incentive for them to do the job properly and I dont' think they have the ability to anyway.
There are so many different things that the finisher may have done which can vary from minor to dreadful. If they used an aniline dye and just got the color uneven then that could maybe be touched up by spraying the dye on the lighter areas over the finish. Then put another coat of clear on. If they used a lacquer stain and got the color uneven then it probably can't be touched up unless it is very minor. A lacquer stain has a paste look to it anyway and to put it over the finish gets questionable. If they sprayed a oil based wiping stain and didn't get all the excess wiped off then the finish is destine to peal off. The finish will bond to the stain instead of the wood. Pictures might help however I'm not sure I could evaluate the job without being there.
 
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