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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I built a kitchen counter out of mahogany.The counter will have a self rimming sink.The countertop will butt against a free standing stove on both sides of the stove.After some investigation I found out epoxy breaks down at 140-160 degrees.The old counter got rather warm when the stove top was on high.I can imagine the finish dripping off.I'd like for the top to be a little darker and then seal it.Is tung oil a clear finish if so can you tint tung oil?Do you poly over tung oil?How about mineral oil?The top is made of 5/4x4's joined together.What is the best top coat for a wooden kitchen countertop?Any suggestions will be appreciated.Thanks.
 

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I saw this over at DIY and didn't answer because I would use the epoxy. I would be concerned if the counter is getting above 100 degrees anyway with a wood top no matter what finish you use.

Have you taken a temp of the counter aftet the stove has been on a while?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I'm concerned by the heat also.It's the top of the range that presnts the problem,lets say boiling a pan of water.The electric element is only 5in.'s from the side of the stove.It didn't damage the old laminate countertop.I haven't taken the temperature of the counter but air temperature can reach 100 degrees in the summer.the counter is obviously warm to the touch.If someone by accident set a warm pan on the top I'm sure it would dent the epoxy.I like the idea of epoxy but leary in appling it(pouring it),never used it before.Very nice top.U-shaped herring bone corners,lots of work,35 sq. ft. afraid of ruining it.There are heat guards that go on the edge's of countertops next to the stove,but not sure of their effectiveness.
 

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I don't know what to tell ya. I've done kitchen counters before with the epoxy but they had a wall oven and the cooktop was a new drop in type so I don't know how hot it got. They never called to complain about any problems. With a wood top your going to have to use trivets with possibl a potholder under that to catch the radiating heat.

The epoxy is pretty easy to work with just be sure to follow directions and mix well. A plastic putty knife works well for moving it around and getting it in place. Be sure to have a propane torch handy to wave over the top to pop any bubbles that rise to the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was thinking an exterior polyurathane.If I do that and it doesn't satisfy me can I epoxy over the urethane without sanding all the urethane off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was under the impression that the hardeners made the finish toxic and once hardend it wasn't toxic anymore.
 

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I haven't had the chance to do it yet on a job but I've thought about carefully placed peices of granite where you would place a hot pot or pan. You should be able to buy small peices for cheap and just cut a recess for them. You could do that on both sides of stove. It would give you a place to put your hot pots and pans plus not effect the finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Just thought about this.I think I could avoid the heat by raising the stove above the countertop.The old stove was about 1/2 in. below the countertop.If it was above the top or even (heat rises) I don't think it would get as hot.Stoves are 36 in.'s high. It depends on you setting the cabinets before or after the floor is installed (hardwood flooring).Pre-manufactrured cabinets are34-1/2 in.'s high + 1 1/2 in. counter=36.Over the 22 yr.'s Ive worked for general contractor's we have always put the unfinished hardwood down before the cabinets which put the stove even with the countertop.Then came pre-finished flooring,where we set the cabinets first,which put your stove higher then your counter depending on the thickness of your flooring.My old cabinets sat on top of the flooring and some how the stove was lower than the countertop(floor out of level).We did it this way to avoid traffic on the finished floor.Being a finisher you understand after the floor is finished no one enters with shoes on, no longer setting cabinets.In Md.finishers post hand written sign's saying floor finished stay out you are responsible.Is there any epoxy you can brush on?Still afraid of the pour.I have to pour it in place along with the back splash any leak and I'm done.I like the idea of the inlaid trivets.
 

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I worked for a Contractor for several years and when we set the kitchen stove we would always adjust the feet so that the stove is even with the top of the counter. Being even or slightly higher will help a lot to keep the heat away from it.

There is no brush on epoxy that I know of. The poured stuff scared me the first time but after that it wasn't a big deal. Make sure to seal any cracks along the back so it doesn't run down into the cabinets. I would seal the backsplash seperately then install with glue and caulk the seam between backsplash and countertop. The epoxy doesn't work very well on vertical surfaces. Be sure to put plastic down on the floor to catch the run off from the pour. The stuff is like molasis, very thick so it doesn't just run everywhere. You will have to help even it out with a plastic putty knife or paint brush but once you get it spread out then it will self level.
 

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Here in UK stoves always flush with work tops. However, trend is to have hob let into worktop and oven at waist with top oven/grill at eye level. Us old folks appreciate not having to get down too low.

Our hob is a Neff with touch controls (no knobs).

johnep
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
This is the response I got from minwax about finishing the top.
Currently Minwax does not manufacture a stain or clear finish that is FDA
approved. We do not perform animal testing and cannot test for ingestion.
Most Minwax clear coatings are fully cured in 14-30 days. Once cured, the
film is considered inert and is no longer releasing toxins or chemicals.

If you are interested in an FDA approved product, I'd recommend Behlen at
866-785-7781 (www.hbehlen.com). Behlen manufacture coatings that are safe
for infant furniture, high chairs, recreational objects (games, puzzles,
children's toys) salad bowls, wooden utensils, chopping/butcher blocks, and
food preparation surfaces. Here's another link you can also try:
http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/
The bohlen website have some nice sounding products.No epoxy though.One product called Rock Hard for table tops stood out for me.Progressive epoxy polymers web site had more information the I could retain(very large,informative site).Any first timer with epoxy(like myself)should visit this website.They do have a brush on epoxy. So me being old school,tried and true,when I pour this top will silicone caulk hold upto the epoxy for filling voids between the top and the wall or will the epoxy melt the silicone.I want to stain the top darker.The mahogany I purchased has quite a bit of blonde in it(lack of quality suppliers in my area).Should I use sanding sealer first for a more even coat.I have never attempted any finishing like this.
 

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OK. Ya gotta keep asking for me to remember all the steps for this. I do it all the time and am doing four vanity tops this week. I stain my tops to the customers color choice. After that I use Zinsser seal coat to seal the tops. Any sealer will work. After the wood is sealed then I will prefill any holes or cracks with the epoxy. I'll mix up little batches and pour over the holes or cracks and allow it to seep into it and try to get it flus to the top. After about an hour or two I'll take the plastic putty knife and wipe it down as flat as I can. It doesn't have to be perfect but the flatter the better. I'll let that set up then the next day I will do a full pour over the whole project.

It should not eat the silicone at all. It is not a volatile mixture. I'll take some pics right now and show progress of the tops I'm working on now.
 

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Here are some Pics that I just took. The first one shows some major cracks I had to prefill. It actually took two time of prefill to get them to the top so I can pour the last coat tomorrow.

The next two are tops that are done and ready for delivery as soon as I finish the other two I'm working on now.





 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
I forgot to ask this.Common sense tells me to pour and then cut the sink out after the epoxy has cured.How about the sanding sealer before I stain for an even coat of stain.Thanks for your help you'v
e been very informative.Questions never asked,unfortunatly are the dumb ones.
The pictures came up while I was typing(slowly).Hardly any of the epoxy fell over the side,I was expecting a water fall.Thanks for the pictures they're worth a thousand words.What brand name do you use and what is the working time of that brand?Forget the sink cutting question.
 
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