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Discussion Starter #1
If you intend to sell a bowl, but don't intend on selling it as a bowl for eating out of, do you still use a food-safe finish just in case somebody doesn't heed your "don't eat out of this bowl" warning?

I like friction finishes/polishes, but I'm worried that even if I placed a sticker on the bottom that exaggerated, "EATING OUT OF THIS BOWL WILL BE FATAL! DON'T EAT OUT OF THIS BOWL!" - somebody might still try to eat out of it, because at the end of the day, it's still a bowl.

Use a food safe finish just to be safe? If so, which one will give me the type of glass-like high gloss I love about friction finishes and the speed and ease of application that friction finishes have?

Thanks!
 

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All (or most) finishes once they are cured are "food safe". I use a friction polish from Doctor's Woodshop that is a mix of walnut oil, shellac and carnuba wax. Perfectly safe to eat off.
 

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Several threads on the forum on this topic, one just a few threads down, but the title is not an obvious connection.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f6/finish-thoughts-fbe-54232/

Some folks have good results with General Finish's "Wood turners finish". It is meant to dry in a few minutes. I did not have such fast drying, but it did eventually dry and I was able to get a smooth polished surface when dry. This is essentially a water based polyurethane.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2083644/35705/General-Finishes-Wood-Turners-Finish-Pint.aspx

I have also had good experience with GF's Salad Bowl Finish. Takes longer to dry, but will be hard finish and easy to buff to a nice polish.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000752/9151/General-Finishes-Salad-Bowl-Finish-Quart.aspx

The friction polish's are very fast to apply, but they do not last long especially if folks wash the bowl.

From what I have read, most finishes are food safe - once cured.

Wipe on poly will be a good water resistant finish, which will buff to a nice polish, but it will take longer to apply.
 

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If you intend to sell a bowl, but don't intend on selling it as a bowl for eating out of, do you still use a food-safe finish just in case somebody doesn't heed your "don't eat out of this bowl" warning?

I like friction finishes/polishes, but I'm worried that even if I placed a sticker on the bottom that exaggerated, "EATING OUT OF THIS BOWL WILL BE FATAL! DON'T EAT OUT OF THIS BOWL!" - somebody might still try to eat out of it, because at the end of the day, it's still a bowl.

Use a food safe finish just to be safe? If so, which one will give me the type of glass-like high gloss I love about friction finishes and the speed and ease of application that friction finishes have?

Thanks!
The label is a good idea but I wouldn't go so far as writing "Eating out of the bowl would be fatal" I think it would be enough just to have a label that says "Not intended for use with food." That would release you from legal liability if some tried a frivolous lawsuit. If you are talking about hugh quantities you might invest in a branding iron with that message. Personally I think any modern finish is food save and would eat off of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The label is a good idea but I wouldn't go so far as writing "Eating out of the bowl would be fatal" I think it would be enough just to have a label that says "Not intended for use with food." That would release you from legal liability if some tried a frivolous lawsuit.
Yeah, like I said - that warning was an exaggeration. I didn't mean for people to think that was really what I would put on a sticker. :laughing:

As to your second point regarding legal liability - I'm not giving legal advice here, nor could I if I even wanted to (I still have a year until I'm an attorney) - but part of my concern is actually that such a label wouldn't actually release me from liability. While common sense would lead one to believe that adequately notifying and/or warning people of a certain condition would create an assumption of risk, there are other factors at play here that could *potentially* defeat that.

Also, if I ever got sued, I'm pretty sure the plaintiff's attorney wouldn't think the suit was frivolous. ;):laughing: I'd rather just avoid it entirely.
 

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Just do your manufacturing in Texas. You almost have to be a millionaire to be sued here. There is so much that is exempt from judgment here it isn't worth the trouble to sue for.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the article. I didn't realize, but apparently CrystalCoat is foodsafe when dry. I have 2 bottles of that in need of being used up. Tried it on a bowl, doesn't work quite as well as it does on pens. Maybe there's a better way to apply it that I need to figure out.
 
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