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I'm making a headboard. It'll be wooden tiles on a backing board. Each tile will be multi-directional kerf cut sections. (I'll post a pic).

Anyway, I have 2 options in mind.

Do I:

A. Make tiles of dimensioned wood and just kerf cut them with an FTG (Flat Top Grind/ripping) blade.

Problem - Although easy to make the piece, this would leave me with the question - between the slats, how do I remove saw marks, apply pre-stain wood conditioner, stain and apply a spar varnish (it's for a yacht and I'm told it may occasionally get wet).

B. Make a thin backing board, make individual slats, pre-finish them (leaving unfinished glue areas), assemble the tiles by gluing and nailing individual slats one at a time to a backing board. Cut the tiles to create designed sections and then compile them to create the finished tile.

Here's a pic to show you what the client wants.
 

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You may experience a great deal of problems with wood movement having wood running in so many different directions. Wood expands and contracts and because of the location may especially expand and contract more than usual. Imagine each piece of wood trying to shrink in width. Then you have it glued to backing board restricting it from doing this. The wood would build up so much pressure it's likely to split to releave the pressure. The design you have you are better off doing it with veneer rather than solid wood. They make a veneer that has a back which is formica. This kind would be a lot easier for the do it yourselfer. It can be laminated to a backing board with contact cement. Because of wood movement regular veneer doesn't do well applied with contact cement.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I see a bigger issue

You can't create those "stopped" kerfs that bump into another set of kerfs at right angles. It ain't gonna happen on a table saw. The mosiac effect in the photo was done either by assembling small pieces of different grain or kerf directions, or photographically to give that appearance, or by ancient alien technology which we have yet to perfect. They could be molded and cast in resin also.

OR it was done in sketchup were there are no tablesaws allowed....
 

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I am sitting here looking at two "doors/drawer fronts" that are much smaller in scale. Thought small scale may get me by. One looks great and the other has a zig zag "crack" where the wood shrank.

George
 

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I am sorry, but can someone please explain "kerf cutting" in this context?

Everything I have found on the web seems to be using the blade to make many thin cuts behind the wood to allow bending. The OP mentioned a flat top grind on the blade. I am struggling to see how all that applies here. Can someone add an explanation so I may understand better?
 

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You can't create those "stopped" kerfs that bump into another set of kerfs at right angles. It ain't gonna happen on a table saw. The mosiac effect in the photo was done either by assembling small pieces of different grain or kerf directions, or photographically to give that appearance, or by ancient alien technology which we have yet to perfect. They could be molded and cast in resin also.

OR it was done in sketchup were there are no tablesaws allowed....
I think each shape is a separate piece. Then they are all assembled together like a puzzle.

For example the first square in the upper left corner is composed of 4 sections.
 

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Junior
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I am sorry, but can someone please explain "kerf cutting" in this context?

Everything I have found on the web seems to be using the blade to make many thin cuts behind the wood to allow bending. The OP mentioned a flat top grind on the blade. I am struggling to see how all that applies here. Can someone add an explanation so I may understand better?
The OP is making the equivalent of wooden heatsinks. He wants to use a straight kerf blade so the bottoms of his slots are flat rather than a V shape.

I don't see why this won't work. Each individual part is rather small. If they are made from hardwood, just glue them to a stable plywood backer and leave a small gap for expansion.

Make some thin sanding sticks that allow for the thickness of the sandpaper to run through the slots. Should come out pretty nice.

Are you planning on using some type of modified box joint jig to get your slots evenly aligned?

 

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The picture appears to be 3 different types of wood. It’s not just a difference in grain direction, there appears to be differences in the grain (type) of the woods.
Cuts may be best done on a bandsaw.
I would use 3/16”-1/4” thick pieces glued to a backing board. Once your final sanding is completed, this will qualify as a very thick veneer.
Even though it’s on a boat, I don’t understand the bed will sometimes get wet. ???
 

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where's my table saw?
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That there is a Sketchup illustration, not a photo of real wood

You can't create those "stopped" kerfs that bump into another set of kerfs at right angles. It ain't gonna happen on a table saw. The mosiac effect in the photo(illustratation) was done either by assembling small pieces of different grain or kerf directions, or photographically to give that appearance, or by ancient alien technology which we have yet to perfect. They could be molded and cast in resin also.

OR it was done in sketchup were there are no tablesaws allowed
....
I think each shape is a separate piece. Then they are all assembled together like a puzzle.

For example the first square in the upper left corner is composed of 4 sections.
We agree. My point was that the kerfs had to be made on smaller separate pieces, a mosaic, then assembled into the squares. Each of the finished squares would then be finished with what ever coating would be somewhat waterproof and then glued to the backer board. This raises another issue. Both sides of the backer board will need to be finished or it will warp. I don't think the smaller pieces OR the squares will present a warping issue, however.
 

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The OP is making the equivalent of wooden heatsinks. He wants to use a straight kerf blade so the bottoms of his slots are flat rather than a V shape. [...]
Thanks - that explains everything. Now I get what I was seeing in the drawing above. I thought I was looking at a moiré pattern from a badly rendered drawing. Now I realize that there are many kerf cuts in the various wood pieces in different directions. The cuts are on the visible side, for artistic effect.

I plan to do the same thing for my drink coasters. I want to make kerf cuts in both directions to make a cross-hatch pattern, where the glass bottom will sit on the resulting "posts." Condensation will drain into the kerf cuts, and the glass will sit on top, so the glass bottom doesn't stick when you lift the glass. My plan is to make a box cutting jig to do it, using a "shallow, but longer" post on the jig to keep the cuts aligned. One early problem in the project: I did not know that they are called "kerf cuts." :-o
 
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