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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm not a turner, but got involved in a discussion on another forum regarding finishing-- salad bowls, cutting boards and trivets.

I read using Mineral OIL was a no no because it can turn rancid. What is the true skinny on this. What is the proper method of finishing for these items that may come in contact with food.

You turners will know I'm certain.

Thanks from a newbie.

I did a google search and found some answers but I'm still interrested in your responses
 

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Actually, its the vege oils that go rancid. stay away from Olive oil etc. Mineral oils are best, but some manufacturers actually have designated food safe oils available, as everyone has already said, so ignore me.
:bangin:
Regards,

Orson
 

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I just made some cutting boards with red, and white oak mixed with black walnut. I was advised to use mineral oil. Took all the wood odor out from the wood and only took 2 coats for it to fully absorb. :icon_smile:
 

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Wood Finishes

IMNHO, mineral oil is the best. It is perfectly safe (it's used as a laxative, after all!). Commercial "salad bowl" or "cutting board" oils are nothing more or less than mineral oil with maybe an additive or two so that 'they' can call it something other than mineral oil (usually a thinner to help penetration).

I use an emulsion of mineral oil and beeswax. I keep a pint canning jar of it around so I don't have to prepare a new batch every time I need some. You can also use parrafin. Warm about a half-cup or so of mineral oil in a double boiler and shave in a tablespoon or so of the wax. After the wax melts pour some of the emulsion on the board and rub it in until thew mixture starts to solidify. Scrape off the excess, rewarm the stuff, and repeat maybe two or three times. Rub it vigoroously with a clean cloth and you're ready to go.

I also warm the board to keep the mixture molten longer and to help absorption.

Just as an aside, I don't use oak, ash, or any other open grained wood because of the possibility of getting tiny food bits caught in the grain. Those bits can then decay and cause the board to turn rancid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Peter that board is absolutely too gorgeous too allow anyone to cut on it. Thanks for sharing.
 
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