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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I debated on making a thread and updating it but I thought it would be better to just let it all out at once since it took me so long to finish.

To start, I bought an old Stanley Bedrock off craigslist for $40 HERE

Pictures of the plane he emailed to me before I bought it.




It was in rough shape to say the least, but it looked structurally solid. First thing I needed to do was get rid of the rust. I bought a bottle of EVAPORUST from Harbor Freight for like $8 and that was one of the best purchases I could have made. Since the plane is nearly 2 feet long, I didn't have anything I could soak it in so I just used one of those vacuum food saver bags.

More detailed photos before the rust removal.






The bag set up


Next was getting the Japanning off. That was easy since I have a sandblaster. I just gave it a once over and went straight to priming. I used an engine primer. I've read that people who do this more than I do think highly of the engine primer and high heat engine paint VS Japanning. I skipped photos of me painting it. Actually, I forgot heh.




Then came the fun part. While the 8 coats of engine paint were curing, I made a new tote and handle since the old ones were broken. When I made the handle, I wanted to make it a bit thicker than normal since I have sausage fingers. I also wanted to give it a grip because of the way my hand tends to rest on hand planes (my pinky is usually hanging off the side) I cut both the tote and handle out of Bocote because it's so rigid and finishes up super nice. Funny thing was I cut them both off of a large blank of wood and the color turned out so different.




This photo is what I used to make the grip, I used a hand file and stuck my turning sandpaper to it. It worked perfectly.




I also made the handle a little thicker. MUCH more comfortable
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I finished up to this point about a month ago, I spent the last month (when I had time) tuning it and making it flat, great thing was that it didn't require much in the flattening department. I took each individual screw and polished it clean. I spent a good amount of time getting the sides and bottom polished up, I even cleaned out the corrugated valleys on the bottom.

I decided to keep the original blade,chip breaker but I might move to an IBC or HOCK kit later on. I sharpened the blade on my TORMEK and it cuts beautifully. I might just keep it as is.

Final Product









THANKS FOR LOOKING!
 

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Nice score on the plane and great job on the restoration.

One of the few benefits of the corrugated sole is perhaps easier to flatten.

I also like to use thicker tote and knob when I make replacements. Easier to grip.

Before you replace the blade consider replacing the chip breaker. This may give you better bang for the buck than a new blade.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=66868&cat=1,41182

Another forum member ryan50hrl was having issues with shavings getting under the cap iron of a vintage Stanley No. 5. I sent him a different vintage blade and cap iron to try and also a Veritas new cap iron. He really like the Veritas and said it was a no contest better performer, so bought this from me.
 
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