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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to keep the whites white and the reds red. Its the whites I am concerned about. I have test tung oil and that darkens it way to much. Teak is a bit better and a butcher block finish is not to bad but its a bit soft if built to a shine. Ow I should mention food safe finish and by that I mean stamped on the side of the container or published food safe. I have tried a water base minwax poly I had around and I didn't like the dead feel it gave the wood. I may try another brand. I have tried a walnut past wax and its ok but I would rather have something I wouldn't worry about drying up or soaking in further over time and leaving dry spots that need to be retreated. I asked this question here due to the food safe part. Thanks.
 

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I prefer Lacquer. Once the solvents have disolved out which just takes a few days it's food safe as are all finishes from what I've read.
 

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I guess I should have clarified more about my use of Lacquer. I was describing it as a finish that doesn't change the color of wood very much and in my opinion is food safe. However I don't use it for bowls that people will eat out of. The reason is simply it won't hold up to washing over the years. It will hold up for quite a while to a light sponge bath if it's used for things like nuts and candy.
For bowls that will be used for salads and cereals I use Mahoney's walnut oil. It's been treated to remove the nut allergy problems and holds up pretty well. I tell customers when the bowl starts looking dull to rub it down with mineral oil. Bowls used like this will need a renewal every so often so I try to use a finish that can be easily renewed.
Lacquer can be repaired but has to be done by a professional. I use it on most other projects because of the ease of application, damage can be repaired, and it's a fairly tough finish.
If you want a finish that causes the least amount of color change use Krylon Fixatiff. comes in a spray can. Can't say for sure if it's food after it cures however although most finishes that I've read about are food safe once the solvents evaporate, at least according to the experts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies folks. I know what you are saying John about cured products but I would like it to be printed or published and I can be 100% honest with someone when I tell them its marketed as food safe. Sad part is just because its printed food safe doesn't always mean its more safe or better than another product but that's part of the blame game.
Dave I wrote that I tried butcher block but I ment to say I have tried a salad bowl finish. I will check out the brand you mention. The one I use dries up on me in the can each time. I have a feeling the product its kind of what John is saying, you drink it you die, but let it cure and all is good and these companies have just spent the money to get the title.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I read up it a bit yesterday after your post. Never would have guessed it came from a bug. Takes a lot of bugs to make a useable amount. You mix flakes in dna?
 

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I read up it a bit yesterday after your post. Never would have guessed it came from a bug. Takes a lot of bugs to make a useable amount. You mix flakes in dna?
Yes alcohol is the solvent.

You can either purchase the flakes are make your own or purchase a can e.g., Zinsser.

If you make your own, it will go off after 5-6 months, so do not make too much.

The Zinsser product has some additive to provide a much longer shelf life.
 

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If you get the zinseer get the de-waxed variety. But your better off making your own as there are different grades/colors and you can make it thin or thick to suit your needs. Keep it in mason jars and put wax paper between the jar and the lid. Heat is the only thing that will cause it to go off. I just learned this weekend that you can store it in the fridge and it will last up to a year.
 

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Heat is the only thing that will cause it to go off. I just learned this weekend that you can store it in the fridge and it will last up to a year.
I can see the fridge slowing down the esterification process, but from what I have read, once the alcohol is added, the process starts and will continue. Older shellac may still be useable, but I would test on a piece of scrap. If the shellac does not cure in the normal time frame, it is best to discard.

In my house if I put anything in the fridge, I would be at risk of my wife throwing it out during one of her purges. :thumbdown:

By the way this link has a lot of information and is a source to purchase the flakes.

http://www.shellac.net/faq.html

"How long will it last in solution?
The rule of thumb is 6 months. Once dissolved, shellac begins a process called esterfication, where its ability to dry to a hard shell begins to degrade. Always date new jars of shellac you mix up, especially if you're not going to use it right away. If it's a few months old, test it on a scrap piece. It should dry to touch in 15 minutes at the most. If not, it's no good. You can still use it to make a tack cloth. On the other hand, don't throw out potentially good shellac, just because it's been sitting around awhile. I've successfully used shellac that's more than 18 months old.
"
 
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