Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've been through the threads on this topic, but I thought I'd "bring it all home" here...

I plan to leave the finish natural. I like the tung oil/wax process, but I'm wondering if that'll be tough enough to hold up against the usual abuse that a coffee table gets... should I apply something over the tung and then wax?

Any help/advice would be great. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
I'm wondering if that'll be tough enough to hold up against the usual abuse that a coffee table gets... should I apply something over the tung and then wax?
The beauty of tung oil and wax is if it does get marred...it can be easily fixed with more tung oil and wax :thumbsup:. A lacquer is a little more work to repair. I personally use it on figured woods and walnut too (oil
/wax) I like the natural wood look. You said you had done some reading here, so I will not repeat it all because it has been discussed before.
Here is one thread http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=952&highlight=oil+wax

Here is another http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/showthread.php?t=446&highlight=oil+wax
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
One thing I forgot to mention. I found Renaissance wax is soluble in tung oil. I have put a dab of the wax on an oil soaked rag and it softened the wax for easier spreading. I would get all your coats of oil on and dried before I did this though. The wax will block the absorption of oil on raw wood I believe. But for a last quick coat I have been doing what I mentioned (after several coats of oil and wax) it seems to buff up better
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Daren, thanks for the reply. I've read those threads you posted, you're the one who got me on the tung/wax notion. I guess I'm gonna do the tung and Ren wax. Soak 'er down in tung oil in multiple coats, then sand away?

Or reapply the tung after each sanding?

One more question, and a big one... for curly maple, how fine do you sand? I've seen mention of four-figure grits... I can see they're available, but how high have you gone? Is there a point of no continued benefit?

And how many coats of RenWax and how do you buff in between?

Just to be clear, I'm looking for a finish that looks like a crystal-clear lake with a curly maple bottom about ten feet deep. ;)

Maybe too much to ask, but I feel like trying... thanks for any advice you can give...
 

·
johnep
Joined
·
2,140 Posts
Sitting at a restaurant table near Piarco airport in Trinidad, I thought I was dining on a pool with driftwood at the bottom. Saw another table in Bermuda with embedded coins which gave same illusion, From here now understand is poured polyurethane.

Have been several threads on this topic.
johnep
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Soak 'er down in tung oil in multiple coats, then sand away?

Or reapply the tung after each sanding?

One more question, and a big one... for curly maple, how fine do you sand?

And how many coats of RenWax and how do you buff in between?
Finish sand first. I go to 400 grit always (600 on occasion). Then apply oil it should not raise the grain where it would need anymore sanding :no:, I have never experienced that. In fact I would be afraid it would make the finish less clear sanding the oil into the wood (as some would advise) if for some reason you did have to sand let it set for 24 hours first.

I put 3 or 4 liberal coats of oil, like dripping rag wet...let them set 30-45 minutes between coats. The first couple coats will go right into the wood. The next couple you will notice it pooling in places, rub it around with the saturated cloth.
Let it set overnight and maybe give it one more shot with the oil if the mood strikes you, I do .

You should let the oil cure for a couple days before waxing. I am not sure cure is the right word, but that is the one I am using.
The number of coats of wax is up to you, it does not really build up a finish like a varnish (the reason for fine sanding, you are finishing the wood not finishing the finish) but with more coats you can buff it to a little better gloss.

One tip, after a few coats of wax that I hand rub on and off I go to power tools. Like a buffer. Or you could like I do (on the cheap) if you have a hook and loop random orbit sander, take a piece of terrycloth or other super soft rag stuck on the sander and use that to finish buff.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top