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Hi,

I(newbie) am doing woodworking in garage and I need to do finishing. It's winter in Oregon(cold, rainy...).

How to make the finish dry faster? I am using water-based polyurethane. One week after I applied the finish to a work piece, I still can smell the odor of polyurethane.

I don't know if a portable heater can help. Or just put a fan inside garage and let the air circulate internally?

Any experience can be shared?

BTW, I noticed that if the water-based finish can't dry quickly like in a day, the smell of polyurethane can last long long time.
 

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Hi,

I(newbie) am doing woodworking in garage and I need to do finishing. It's winter in Oregon(cold, rainy...).

How to make the finish dry faster? I am using water-based polyurethane. One week after I applied the finish to a work piece, I still can smell the odor of polyurethane.

I don't know if a portable heater can help. Or just put a fan inside garage and let the air circulate internally?

Any experience can be shared?

BTW, I noticed that if the water-based finish can't dry quickly like in a day, the smell of polyurethane can last long long time.
Slow drying will make any finish aqueous or solvent base off gas longer than it would when applied at the proper temperature ok?

As to water borne i will leave it to others to help you with thats not my expertise nor do i lke the stuff. :no:
 

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I started spraying water based poly and it needs to be over 45 -50 deg , or you chance runs, but also the finish surface is effected by drying time. It flows out better but (for example) if shooting flat, the slow drying will give you a gloss instead.
You could spray/apply it, and after the surface is safe enough to not take on dust, blue tarp it over and put a small space heater under it. Try and maintain 70-90 deg.

Wrong time of year to use poly.
 

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I used to spray lacquer at -0 temps in Minnesota. This stuff will dry no matter what the temp. Water based finishes need to be warm enough and the humidity low enough for the water to evaporate out.
 

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How to make the finish dry faster? I am using water-based polyurethane. One week after I applied the finish to a work piece, I still can smell the odor of polyurethane.

Bad urethane?

As a general rule the water based urethanes dry rather quickly
Some dry dust proof in mere moments and the surface can be sanded and re coated in less than an hour.

So I'm thinking that the gremlins swapped your urethane for a batch of grease.

But there are unanswered questions that I should think needed to have been in the OP
What Urethane?
How old is it?
How long since you last used it?
How'd it perform the last time?
What temperature is your shop?
What humidity is it in there?

Did you add anything to this urethane?

All critical questions needing answers before you can get anywhere.
 

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Because waterborne finishes are made with lots of water and the water must evaporate for the other chemicals in the solution to come into contact and coalesce, relative humidity is an issue. High humidity will greatly slow up the evaporation process. Most waterbornes caution about applying them when the humidity is greater than 80-85%.

Temperatures below 60-65 degrees can significantly slow the curing time.
 

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Because waterborne finishes are made with lots of water
Yes they are.
My favorite finish GF Enduro Pre Cat 181 is 63 - 73% water. But the stuff cures absolutely Dust Proof in mere moments.
I don't know how this works, but it does.
 
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