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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm practicing finishing on a scrap piece of maple using water based dye and topping it with water based polaccrylic. First I applied the dye followed by a sprayed on coat of sealer. I then sanded it lightly with 220 and sprayed the first coat of poly then I lightly sanded at 320 to remove the nibs and repeated this process for 3 more coats. After the final coat was dry I was very pleased with the results with the exception of a few dust nibs so I tried sanding them out with 800 then 1200 using a lubricant. The sample is super smooth but now it looks all scratched. The general finishes website says there is no need to sand the final coat but how do I remove the dusts nibs to get it perfectly smooth ? Do I need to use a higher grit sandpaper like 2000?
 

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Rick Mosher
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Usually the dust nibs in the finish are dust that settles as the top coat dries. I put my piece under a protective sheet (cardboard will work) just a couple inches above it immediately after applying the top coat. This keeps 98% of particles from falling into the finish.

When doing a larger job I use a drying rack like this:

That way each piece acts as a dust barrier for the next, I just have to put a clean panel on top and then work my way down.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/immediately
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh yeah I'm wiping everything down..there really isn't anything at all for dust in it. My sample is only a 6"x6" piece. There might be literally one spec I'm just wondering if I were to do a large project if there is a final sanding/buffing stage that I should be doing?
 

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Rick Mosher
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There are 2 other options after finishing, one is a nib file which when used with a light touch will file the offending dust speck down without damage to the finish or else you can rub out the entire finish. Rubbing out can be a topic as complicated as finishing itself and there are MANY different techniques. I have tried most of them and these days prefer wet sanding with Abralon pads on a random orbital sander.
 
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