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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am still fairly new to this craft and am working with a sawstop table saw with the standard fence it comes with and my router table is a kreg frame with an incra top and fence.

My issue is, neither fence seems to align very well. The sawstop fence is very solid and nice but I still find myself adjusting both ends with a ruler to ensure it is absolutely parallel to the blade and wings of the table. The router fence is a bit worse and requires more adjusting to get it perfect. Is this normal? It seems like an extra step is all but when I adjust my fence(s) I can almost guarantee it won't be completely accurate and straight, and so I break out the ruler to fine tune.
 

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You should not worry about the wings or the router. The main item is for the table saw blade to be parallel to the mitre slot and the fence.

I have an Incra router table fence. I never worry about alignment of the router fence, since I am typically using a router bit for edge forming. If my wood is straight, my edge profile will be straight, especially if I am using a router bit with a bearing.

I may not be understanding your problem. How about some pictures?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can't really post pictures since I'm at work but say for example, i adjust my router fence to where I want it. If I measure from the face of the fence to the side of the table (the side where I'm standing when I'm routing), it may not be the same from the very right side of the fence as the left side. In other words, the fence is at a slight degree to the table since it locks on the left and right side. When I run a length of wood across the bit along the fence, it travels at a slight angle. I'm terrible with explaining stuff, so I'm not sure this is making much sense, but I have the same issue with my table saw with the fence not being completely accurate with the table when I adjust it.
 

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You need to be concerned about the table saw blade mitre slot and fence alignment, but not blade to edges of the table.

With the router the only issue is the fence being straight. If there is a slight angle of the fence to the edges of the table, this may look odd, but will not impact how the router bit cuts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok I think now I understand the principle of the router fence angle not really mattering, you've opened my eyes to that so I really don't need to align it.

on the table saw, I know the fence is good and my saw is brand new so I'm assuming the blade is straight when I set it. For me, I don't trust the fence being accurately aligned on the table each time I adjust it, so i measure the fence face on both ends to one of the mitre grooves (that I know is straight) so that the fence is aligned to the table to make a straight cut. I'm just wondering if this is normal or do most people just adjust the fence and assume both sides are aligned perfectly.
 

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on the table saw, I know the fence is good and my saw is brand new so I'm assuming the blade is straight when I set it. For me, I don't trust the fence being accurately aligned on the table each time I adjust it, so i measure the fence face on both ends to one of the mitre grooves (that I know is straight) so that the fence is aligned to the table to make a straight cut. I'm just wondering if this is normal or do most people just adjust the fence and assume both sides are aligned perfectly.
Blades can have run-out, which is where the steel of the blade is not running in a single plane at right angles to axis of rotation. Rare, but can happen. Easy to check.

I calibrate my blade to be parallel to my mitre slot, then my Biesemeyer fence to be parallel to the mitre slot. I check every few months in case something moved, but after calibration I assume it is good.

I would not expect blade to mitre slot alignment to shift, but I have experienced fence to mitre slot to shift. My fence has two screws for this alignment, which do not lock, so each time I remove the fence the screws could, and have moved from time to time. Very slight.

Assuming you have aligned the blade to mitre slot.

Quick check of the fence to mitre slot is to align the fence to be flush with the mitre slot at the front. Lock the fence, confirm fence end is still flush, then feel with finger at the far end of the mitre slot. The finger is very sensitive and you will be able to tell if not flush.
 

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If your sawstop has the same fence as the one I use, you shouldn't try to position or square it before pulling down the cam lever. Tightening the cam will straighten out the fence parallel to the blade (assuming it was set parallel when you first set up your saw). Slide the fence so the tape indicator is at or close to the dimension you want, then lock the lever. Check distance from fence to blade. If off a small amount (x), loosen the fence and move it that (x) amount. Lock, then recheck fence to blade. You should be able to adjust the tape indicator window to be "perfect", then trust the fence once locked with the indicator at the dimension you want.
 

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I would not tolerate a fence that does not lock on to an exact measurement by simply aligning the hairline indicator over the desired measurement. You most likely spent a goodly sum for the Sawstop saw and if I were you I'd be very upset with the quality of the fence.

My saw is nothing special, a Grizzly G1023 with a Shop Fox fence. When I purchased the saw used and set it up in my shop I adjusted the fence dialed in the hair line indicator. I check it regularly for accuracy but have not had to adjust it except when using a different width blade. It's dead on every time.

I'd call the manufacturer and complain.

Bret
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quick check of the fence to mitre slot is to align the fence to be flush with the mitre slot at the front. Lock the fence, confirm fence end is still flush, then feel with finger at the far end of the mitre slot. The finger is very sensitive and you will be able to tell if not flush.
This is where my question is. Exactly. Sometimes my fence is aligned with the mitre slot in the front but the rear is off maybe a tiny bit. Is this normal? it's an easy fix but if I move the fence out a bit away from the blade, I use a ruler to measure from the mitre slot to the fence face in the front and back and just adjust it. I just want to make sure the fence is absolutely parallel to the mitre slot at all times and just clamping it down, sometimes its not.
 

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This is where my question is. Exactly. Sometimes my fence is aligned with the mitre slot in the front but the rear is off maybe a tiny bit. Is this normal? it's an easy fix but if I move the fence out a bit away from the blade, I use a ruler to measure from the mitre slot to the fence face in the front and back and just adjust it. I just want to make sure the fence is absolutely parallel to the mitre slot at all times and just clamping it down, sometimes its not.
You have a problem with your fence. Once calibrated, it should lock down the same each time.

I am not familiar with the Sawstop fence design so I cannot advise what may be happening.

Try posting some detail pictures of how this fence locks in position.
 

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the fence looks like a Biesmeyer clone

SawStop PCS31230-PFA30 3-HP Professional Cabinet Saw Assembly with 30-Inch Premium Fence System, Rails and Extension Table - Amazon.com

Mouse over the fence to see.

There are set screws on the back of the rail that press on a wide steel bar with nylon shoes that ride the rail of the rail. It could be the screws need to be turned in 1/2 a turn each to make the fence more snug. It's easy to try.
It should not move at the rear when gently but firmly pushed to the right or left. The slack, if any, can be taken up with the set screws, IF it's the same design as the Biesemeyer.

Photo shows the underside of the fence and the bar, the set screws are not visible, but an Allen wrench is inserted into the closest one:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Here is my saw




Here I am measuring the distance from the face rear of the fence to the end of the table apron




Blown up you can see the distance 3.5



Now measuring the back side



blownup its about 3.3 inches



So everytime I adjust my fence it is slightly off, which i can correct by measuring it each time and tapping it into alignment.
 

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You are not showing the locking mechanism on the fence.

The important measurement is blade to mitre slot being parallel then mitre slot to fence being parallel.

Forget about measuring to the edge of the table, it does not matter. If the fence is parallel to the mitre slot, you can cut. Distance to the edges of the table are mute.
 

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Here's a simple method I learned for checking if the fence is parallel. Take your combination square and lock it tight. Set the edge of the head in the miter slot with the blade extending toward the fence at the front edge of the table. Slide your fence over so it just contacts the blade of the square and lock your fence down. Now just slide the square down the miter slot and check the contact with the fence as you go. If it's less than 1/32 off, no real issue. In fact some folks set their fence so it toes out slightly which in theory will help prevent kickback.

Let me know if this makes sense to you or if you want some pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I guess I was assuming the mitre slot would be parallel to the blade from the manufacturer. And I'm also assuming the mitre slot would be parallel to the edge of the apron which is why I used that as a reference. Basically, there is slight play in the fence that throws it off now that I'm playing with it. I'll measure my blade to mitre slot and just check it all out.

Sawdustfactory - makes complete sense, that's kind of like what I did and it was off .2". So I have to just tap the back of the fence until it's exact
 

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I notice you have the contractor style saw. Does it have an aluminum rail in the back?

If so, maybe you should look at the back end of the fence. There should be a nut to tighten the part that locks to the rear rail.
 

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I guess I was assuming the mitre slot would be parallel to the blade from the manufacturer. And I'm also assuming the mitre slot would be parallel to the edge of the apron which is why I used that as a reference.
Assuming without confirming can lead to trouble. Been there, made that mistake.

The blade to mitre slot may have been aligned at the factory, but things can move during shipment.

I have the new design of the Delta Unisaw. I had to tweak my mitre slot when I first setup the saw. This was expected.

Always good to check a calibration.

I will re-check before a big project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Assuming without confirming can lead to trouble. Been there, made that mistake.

The blade to mitre slot may have been aligned at the factory, but things can move during shipment.

I have the new design of the Delta Unisaw. I had to tweak my mitre slot when I first setup the saw. This was expected.

Always good to check a calibration.

I will re-check before a big project.
What would be the most accurate way to verify this? Just measure from the blade to the mitre slot or is there a tool like the one to measure blade height..
 

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there should be no "play"

When the fence is locked, there should be no play at the back end.

When sliding the fence, ease it over to the right hand miter slot and see it's it's parallel when you push it beyond so the slot edge shows, leaving a sliver of the top visible.... parallel or not? Feel with your finger to see if it's flush.....flush or not?
Clamp the fence in position, does it stay in place or shift? :blink:

I mentioned the adjustment process earlier...what did you find out? Are there set screws to adjust the fence for parallelism?

Checking for blade parallelism.
Using the right hand miter slot and a combination square, set the square head into the slot and extend the rule over to a marked tooth on the blade toward the front, so it just barley touches. Tighten the rule and the rotate the blade toward the rear and make the same comparison. The actual measurement is not important, it's just whether the blade is parallel to the miter slot.

You may need to adjust the carriage or trunnions or the table, to bring it into parallel.
 
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