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i have a few friends wanting me to build stove top covers. i'd like to do something behind just a plain jane stove top cover that youtube and etsy is flooded with. i'd like to add a sliding dovetail or something on the edge joints but wanted to know if anyone has done anything similiar and has pictures. or any pictures of edge joinery

(please spare the post about how dangerous it is to put wood on a stove top)
 

· The Nut in the Cellar
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Wow, I didn't think this was done. When I saw the thread title, all I could think of were the metal cooker cooktop covers you see in British TV shows. Have to go Googling now.

OK, I see now. I really like the monogrammed ones and the laser etched ones. I could see them used in a small kitchen with limited counter space and being used as a cutting board saving counter space for other uses. I think a good safety feature would be a cover that covers the knobs so they can't accidentally be turned on while the cover is in place. As far as construction goes, it's basically a hollow cutting board.
 
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i have a few friends wanting me to build stove top covers. i'd like to do something behind just a plain jane stove top cover that youtube and etsy is flooded with. i'd like to add a sliding dovetail or something on the edge joints but wanted to know if anyone has done anything similiar and has pictures. or any pictures of edge joinery

(please spare the post about how dangerous it is to put wood on a stove top)
I've done that. We had a stove which the top burners quit working but the oven worked so I covered a piece of MDF with a piece of formica and got an electric hotplate.
 

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I think a good safety feature would be a cover that covers the knobs so they can't accidentally be turned on while the cover is in place.
I'd have the fear of accidentally turning on the stove and catching the house on fire.. maybe I'm missing something here..
What kind of range do you guys have that the burners can be accidentally turned on? Every variation of gas and electric I've used required deliberate action (press in then turn the knob) to activate.
 

· The Nut in the Cellar
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Yes, the front mounted knobs have to be pushed in (a very slight push), but I think in a rush, a user could bump into a knob in a way that slightly turns the knob and lights the burner. I've done that, but caught it when I heard the igniter clicking. A thick wooden cover would muffle that noise and it could be missed if the kitchen were busy. Since the government now wants to ban gas stoves this discussion may be moot someday. In a similar vein, Ohio just passed a law making natural gas a "green fuel".
 

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Yes, the front mounted knobs have to be pushed in (a very slight push), but I think in a rush, a user could bump into a knob in a way that slightly turns the knob and lights the burner. I've done that, but caught it when I heard the igniter clicking. A thick wooden cover would muffle that noise and it could be missed if the kitchen were busy. Since the government now wants to ban gas stoves this discussion may be moot someday. In a similar vein, Ohio just passed a law making natural gas a "green fuel".
At the recent Christmas party I hosted at my house, one of the guests was leaning on the cooktop and turned on a burner with his butt. He had no idea he did it until I pointed it out to him. My real concern isn't fire, but gas pouring from an unlit burner going unnoticed as I think the burner probably will not ignite with the covering over the burner.
 

· The Nut in the Cellar
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The wooden covers sit on top of the grates over the burners. That would allow enough air space to allow the burners to ignite the gas. Our stove has an oval fifth burner in the center with a solid griddle over the entire center of the stove. It lights just fine with that solid iron cover in place. We replaced the griddle plate with an open grate like the rest of the stove.
 
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The wooden covers sit on top of the grates over the burners. That would allow enough air space to allow the burners to ignite the gas. Our stove has an oval fifth burner in the center with a solid griddle over the entire center of the stove. It lights just fine with that solid iron cover in place. We replaced the griddle plate with an open grate like the rest of the stove.
My stove is similar - six burners and a center grilling station. The controls are on the face of the range. That's how his butt hit the knob. I can still see how a burner valve can be opened but not enough to engage the igniter, allowing gas to spew into the house.

No one answered why this thing is desired and what one does with it when the stove is needed for cooking. Seems like it would be a hassle to have to pull it off and stow it temporarily until the stove is again cool enough to replace it. Ah, to each their own, but not for me.
 

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No one answered why this thing is desired
They are both decorative and functional in creating additional working space.


what one does with it when the stove is needed for cooking.
You asked, then answered your own question.
have to pull it off and stow it temporarily until the stove is again cool enough to replace it.

to each their own, but not for me.
Okay. Maybe you could answer the OPs question instead?
 

· The Nut in the Cellar
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I like this one. It's basically a shallow box turned upside down. I would glue up the panel using biscuits and glue to join the individual boards to make up the main panel. The sides and ends can be joined to the panel with biscuits also. No complex joinery for such a utilitarian piece. Assembled with the proper orientation, there are no exposed joints to show off complex joinery. Yes, I like to use biscuits. Never had joint issues with them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I like this one. It's basically a shallow box turned upside down. I would glue up the panel using biscuits and glue to join the individual boards to make up the main panel. The sides and ends can be joined to the panel with biscuits also. No complex joinery for such a utilitarian piece. Assembled with the proper orientation, there are no exposed joints to show off complex joinery. Yes, I like to use biscuits. Never had joint issues with them.
i really like that idea, it's very nice looking. part of me wants to do some more complex joinery because to me it is just more visually pleasing and a display of craftsmanship, i do like the idea of a box like you mentioned because it would be much more useful
 
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