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bikeshooter
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Discussion Starter #1
I had a discussion recently with a business owner that sold some bar stools constructed with a mortise/tendon joint that failed and he had to replace the units. He used the green label Titebond as his adhesive. My question is - if the material used had too high of a moisture content, could that high moisture content have caused the joint failure? - Titebond being waterbased?

All comments appreciated.
 

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Old School
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I had a discussion recently with a business owner that sold some bar stools constructed with a mortise/tendon joint that failed and he had to replace the units. He used the green label Titebond as his adhesive. My question is - if the material used had too high of a moisture content, could that high moisture content have caused the joint failure? - Titebond being waterbased?

All comments appreciated.

There are many reasons a joint may fail. Without specific information as to wood species, moisture content, temperatures, a high MC COULD be contributory to joint failure. I emphasized COULD because I'm more of the thinking it was due to a poor fit of the M&T's, or not enough glue, or temperature of the... wood/ambient/glue...too cold, or not enough cure time, or joints that needed clamping. The glue could have been no good.

If the MC was too high, it would have to be enough to alter the glue consistency by more than 5%. For a joint, it seems that would be pretty wet.










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bikeshooter
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503 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
There are many reasons a joint may fail. Without specific information as to wood species, moisture content, temperatures, a high MC COULD be contributory to joint failure. I emphasized COULD because I'm more of the thinking it was due to a poor fit of the M&T's, or not enough glue, or temperature of the... wood/ambient/glue...too cold, or not enough cure time, or joints that needed clamping. The glue could have been no good.

If the MC was too high, it would have to be enough to alter the glue consistency by more than 5%. For a joint, it seems that would be pretty wet.










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Thanks for the info.
 
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