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Discussion Starter #1
I've read about making face framed cabinets 2 ways.

1. The face frame is made 1st then the carcass is built to match.

2. The carcass is built first then the face frame is made to fit.

Any opinions which is the better method. I'm sorta leaning towards #2 as you can custom fit it to the carcass but maybe there are other considerations.

Brian
 

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Bah humbug
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If your not use to cutting everything at once, make the frames first and then you can use the frame for a reference.
 

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I like to make the faceframes first also. Those have to be on the money for your finished cabinets to fit where they're are going. Actually heading out to the shop now to start some vanities.
Mike Hawkins
 

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I am the odd ball here, I like to build the boxes then fit the face frame to the box. I may give it a try building the FF first next time. I can see where it would be easier to see if a cabinet fit before building completely though.
 

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Bah humbug
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Frames help especially on custom cabinets. Extended ends, returns all have to be figured in.
 

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Defintely frames first. Make them to fit tight in the space. Then make cabinet 1/2 smaller on any blind side. That way if there is a problem fitting just trim the overhang to fit.
 

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Wall ends you have atleast 1/2. Stove openings and dishwasher opening 1/2 on each side.
 

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You can do it either way, but if you're fitting a built in to a wall or between 2 walls, building it first lets you figure out the scribing, then build the boxes to whatever offset you want on the FF.

Large FF's can be a bit bulky to move around.
 

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As a professional furniture/cabinet maker for 28 years, I have NEVER built the face frames first. I know some who do, but I always build my boxes, then the face frames. I'm not saying it's better or worse, it's just that there are comments implying that it's obvious to build the frames first. I disagree, wholeheartedly. If you have to build the frames first to make sure they fit a space, then your basic measuring and math skills are lacking.
 

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Bah humbug
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With a layout, software or not the job should be layed out. It doesnt matter what you build first. In most cabinet shops each department frames,doors,drawers,countertops, boxes and are cut out by several departments at the same time. It all comes out at the end. That's production.

For space I build the face frames,doors and drawers first. But the box parts are cut at the same time. My nailers,etc are cut at the very end after everything else has been cut.

Most shops want the frames ready for the boxes when they are built. This way the frame can be put on immediately by the builder once he/she has built the box. It also helps the builder reference the frame and catch an era..

I've worked in small and large shops. They all have the same goal...

There's really nothing to disagree about. Where all after the same result....

I've ran many shops.......And I hate long posts.
 

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IMLE as a total amateur compared to some of you guys 😁 I’ve found built ins are much easier to test the fit and scribe if you make the FF first, especially a large unit you can install the boxes separately and then attach FF’s. Measuring and math can’t help you with a crooked wall out of plum that has to be scribed. You can’t wrestle an 8’ wide by 8’ high unit between two walls without damage. Well, I can’t.

I never build anything other than frameless cabs anyway.....so its not even a question for me 😉
 

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I've built both. Framed and framed. I started in commercial and went into custom cabinets later.i went where they payed the most. Whoever writes the biggest check gets me.

Now I just sit in the corner and twiddle my thumbs...
working-that-corner-like-a-pro.jpg
 

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As a professional furniture/cabinet maker for 28 years, I have NEVER built the face frames first. I know some who do, but I always build my boxes, then the face frames. I'm not saying it's better or worse, it's just that there are comments implying that it's obvious to build the frames first. I disagree, wholeheartedly. If you have to build the frames first to make sure they fit a space, then your basic measuring and math skills are lacking.
Hmmm.. Glad I read this because I would have never thought to make frames first in a million years.. I think I'll stick to tried and true..
 
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Bah humbug
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As a professional furniture/cabinet maker for 28 years, I have NEVER built the face frames first. I know some who do, but I always build my boxes, then the face frames. I'm not saying it's better or worse, it's just that there are comments implying that it's obvious to build the frames first. I disagree, wholeheartedly. If you have to build the frames first to make sure they fit a space, then your basic measuring and math skills are lacking.
I can build any part of of first.doors,drawers, boxes. I t doesnt matter to me.but in my shop space is a problem But that's the advantage of doing it 37 years as a cabinet, commercial and furniture maker.

I lay the whole set out in the beginning to maximize parts....
 

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mmwood_1.
I have to take exception to your comment " If you have to build the frames first to make sure they fit a space, then your basic measuring and math skills are lacking." I can assure you that my measuring and math skills are quite proficient. I have worked in or owned a production cabinet shop from 1979 until I recently retired. Although it is Important to turn out the absolute best quality work possible, It's also important to make money, and time IS money. Although YOU have probably never made a mistake, they do happen in other shops. The idea of making face frames first allows you to get someone started on the doors and drawers while the carcasses are being built. It will also make it easier to fix any problems, thus saving time, money, and the aggravation of having to alter a full cabinet by just trimming the overhang to fit. Just my humble opinion.
 

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As a professional furniture/cabinet maker for 28 years, I have NEVER built the face frames first. I know some who do, but I always build my boxes, then the face frames. I'm not saying it's better or worse, it's just that there are comments implying that it's obvious to build the frames first. I disagree, wholeheartedly. If you have to build the frames first to make sure they fit a space, then your basic measuring and math skills are lacking.
That makes two of us.
 

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mmwood_1.
I have to take exception to your comment " If you have to build the frames first to make sure they fit a space, then your basic measuring and math skills are lacking." I can assure you that my measuring and math skills are quite proficient. I have worked in or owned a production cabinet shop from 1979 until I recently retired. Although it is Important to turn out the absolute best quality work possible, It's also important to make money, and time IS money. Although YOU have probably never made a mistake, they do happen in other shops. The idea of making face frames first allows you to get someone started on the doors and drawers while the carcasses are being built. It will also make it easier to fix any problems, thus saving time, money, and the aggravation of having to alter a full cabinet by just trimming the overhang to fit. Just my humble opinion.
[/QUOTE
I have never needed to alter a full cabinet dimensions for a fit. There is always a filler somewhere. Then there is plywood, which is never 100% true in shape. To tweak a faceframe to fit the box is a lot easier than tweaking a box to fit a faceframe. To each his own. In a automated shop, using CNC it really does not matter, nothing is made first to fit something later. Those processes are totally separate and often overlap each and other. The parts are standard sizes stored in multiple storage systems prior to going to the assembly line.
 
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willemjm
I agree to your statement " To each his own" If you prefer to build carcass first, do it and be happy. However to imply that anyone who builds face frame first cant measure or do math seems a bit arrogant and short sighted. I can care less how a person chooses to do it. I was just offering my opinion.
 
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