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Senior Something
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I pretty sure face frames should be glued to the carcass of a cabinet, bookcase, etc., but I worry about wood movement of the stiles being restricted by being glued in place. Am I worrying about nothing?
 

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Old School
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I pretty sure face frames should be glued to the carcass of a cabinet, bookcase, etc., but I worry about wood movement of the stiles being restricted by being glued in place. Am I worrying about nothing?
Yes...don't worry...be happy.:laughing: Glue the face frame.






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Senior Something
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I should have explained a little better so you don't think I'm a complete idiot. I've seen examples were pocket screws, biscuits or brads are used so the faceframe would float. I'd rather glue it to add a little strength and a better look, so I though I'd just ask what others do.

Thanks
 

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Old School
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I should have explained a little better so you don't think I'm a complete idiot. I've seen examples were pocket screws, biscuits or brads are used so the faceframe would float. I'd rather glue it to add a little strength and a better look, so I though I'd just ask what others do.

Thanks
Face frames should be firmly attached to the leading edge of a cabinet. It stiffens the cabinet components, and carries the weight and action of the doors. Face frames should not "float".






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Banned
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Has mentioned already. Glue the face frame. Some people just butt joint some use biscuits either works but me I use a dado in the face frame and a rabbet cut on the carcass its more work but that's how I prefer to do it.
 

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You don't have to worry about wood movement with face frames. It's when you have larger panels like the panels in cabinet doors that wood movement needs to be considered. On door panels the frame around the panel is glued but the panel itself is allowed to float free.
 

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Senior Something
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all your replies.

The face frame is on, but I have a new problem. The face frame didn't turn out as tight as I would have like it. A slight gap in one corner developed when clamping. The wood is pine and I am going to use a wood conditioner before staining so the finish won't end up blotching like is so common? with pine. Can I use a wood filler the same color as pine, treat with wood conditioner and then stain? Or would a dark streak result? Any other ideas?

Thanks
 

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Thanks for all your replies.

The face frame is on, but I have a new problem. The face frame didn't turn out as tight as I would have like it. A slight gap in one corner developed when clamping. The wood is pine and I am going to use a wood conditioner before staining so the finish won't end up blotching like is so common? with pine. Can I use a wood filler the same color as pine, treat with wood conditioner and then stain? Or would a dark streak result? Any other ideas?

Thanks
If you use a wood conditioner chances are the place you fill will be a light streak rather than dark. If that happens you can color the streak with a small artist brush and some tinting color or a touch up marker will work. If you want to be sure, you could fill a nail hole on some scrap wood and try the finish.
 

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Senior Something
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I had glued the carcass together the day before and then I fitted the half-set frame to the carcass. There's a couple of things I should have done differently; hindsite, you known. I don't want to concentrate on those things just on how to fix the problem.
 

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Senior Something
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you use a wood conditioner chances are the place you fill will be a light streak rather than dark. If that happens you can color the streak with a small artist brush and some tinting color or a touch up marker will work. If you want to be sure, you could fill a nail hole on some scrap wood and try the finish.
I'd rather have a light streak than a dark. Then I could adjust the color as you have said. And yes I guess a test piece would be the smart thing to do.
 
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