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I have an oak dining table that I ruined the finish on years ago with a nasty cleaning product. It left the finish sticky and gummy and not very nice to look at. I actually lived with it for the past year with tablecloths, but really missed the wood. So, I stripped it with Citristrip, restained with minwax Provincial stain (these steps seemed to go well). I then used two coats of fast drying polyurethane in a satin finish and it looked well. Everything I found indicated that you might want to do a third coat on a high-use item. Still looked good after 3rd, but saw paintbrush hair and a small curly fuzzy that dried in finish. At the advice of another, I sanded that coat to get rid of imperfections, and did another coat of urethane (BIG MISTAKE) it is way to glossy now and does not look near as nice as it did. Do I need to strip everything again and start all over or is it possible to sand just through the polyurethane and begin with it again? Maybe I should try the wipe-on variety rather than brush-on. I am really unhappy with the way it is now.
 

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We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answereing some questions.

If the finish is cured, I would wet sand the top with a block and wet-or-dry silicone carbide paper, using water. You could start with 220x -320x to flatten and smooth. Then apply the finish with a wipe on cloth made from a lint free "T" shirt material. Make sure your area is dust free, and allow the area to be that way until the finish dries.






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You definitely do not need to take the whole 3rd coat off. Just scuff sand it with 320 or 400 grit wet or dry sandpaper (with the grain), clean off All of the dust, and you are ready for a new coat of finish. I would use satin wipe-on poly by Minwax, which can be applied with a cloth. Make sure the cloth is lint free and use your hand to give the surface one last check for dust specks. Your hand can feel dust much better than your eyes can see it.

Another option is to use Minwax spray polyurethane in a can. If you have a way to do it outside or in a garage, where there is no dust in the air, spraying on the finish will give a really nice finish.
 

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you started with satin

Was the 3rd coat gloss? If so, that was your mistake.
It if were me, and I have some experience with this, I'd use a sharp card scraper, rather than sanding. Sanding may gum up and then you will have a greater issue. A card or cabinet scraper will remove fine shaving of the top material and if you are cautious, you can make a clean and smooth surface.

You Tube has a bunch of instruction videos on their use. And by all means top coat with the very same product as you started with... if necessary. You may find the finish to your liking after scraping.

 

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The finish should determine the sheen. There is flattening agents in the finish which make it semi-gloss or satin. I believe if the finish was too glossy the finish wasn't stirred sufficient on the third coat. You could rub the finish out but I've never liked the appearance of a rubbed satin finish. I would thoroughly sand the entire top again a put a fourth coat on. You could also do like MNsawyergp suggested and use the rattle can poly. If it is a large top you might get two cans and have a helper stand by with the second can ready to go in case you run out with the first can. If you stop at all with rattle can spray it will leave a mark. It's important to keep a wet edge while you are spraying.
 
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