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The Man
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a craftsman 10" bandsaw:


The resaw capacity for this saw, with the bearing guides on, is just about 4-3/4". Is there a way I can increase capacity to, say 5-1/2" without major surgery or rigging something that will eventually fly apart and kill me?

Ultimately I will get a bigger bandsaw, so this is just a band-aid as my table saw upgrade is the hungriest alligator at the moment...

Bobby
 

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where's my table saw?
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Bobby!

Resize that picture, it's as big as a billboard! :eek:
Or you can just delete it, because there is no way to increase the height on that unit, I know I have one. It's a welded frame machine with no way to increase the height of the support column. Leave it as is and just get a 14" cast iron column saw. You can add a riser block to those to get a 6" increase in height.
 

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The Man
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Discussion Starter #5
Resize that picture, it's as big as a billboard! :eek:
Or you can just delete it, because there is no way to increase the height on that unit, I know I have one. It's a weld frame machine with no way to increase the height of the support column. Leave it as is and just get a 14" cast iron column saw. You can add a riser block to those to get a 6" increase in height.

Well, shucks... can't afford a table saw AND an new band saw all at once... unfortunately I may just be stuck with this for a while...
 

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Can't tell from the picture - is the part (red arrow) fixed, and the guides adjust at (green arrow)? If so, I think some mods to the (red arrow) part might gain you an inch or so. Hard to tell without seeing it. But then do you have any access to machining facilities?
 

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The Man
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758 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Can't tell from the picture - is the part (red arrow) fixed, and the guides adjust at (green arrow)? If so, I think some mods to the (red arrow) part might gain you an inch or so. Hard to tell without seeing it. But then do you have any access to machining facilities?
You bring up an interesting point...

Red arrow is a hollow aluminum sleeve that moves up and down on a rack and pinion. You'll notice a large black wing nut above red arrow that is the locking mechanism for the slide. Green arrow is a large solid piece of aluminum that contains three guide bearings and their adjustment mechanisms. It removes from red arrow with a single set screw.

Not only do I have access to machining facilities, my father is a metalworker.

I wonder if I could a) shorten the red arrow sleeve. Fully retracted into the machine there is still about an inch exposed. Or b) I wonder if I could make another blade guide mechanism to fit into the green arrow slot... This was honestly my first intention.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Quoting:
You bring up an interesting point...
Red arrow is a hollow aluminum sleeve that moves up and down on a rack and pinion. 100_2744.jpg
The rack determines the the amount of vertical travel, which is limited.

100_2743.jpg \
With the guide assembly on you have 3 1/2" of height.

Quoting:
I wonder if I could shorten the red arrow sleeve. Fully retracted into the machine there is still about an inch exposed.
100_2745.jpg

I wonder if I could make another blade guide mechanism to fit into the green arrow slot... This was honestly my first intention.
100_2746.jpg
With the guide assembly removed you have 4 3/4" of height. I don't see how that would work.
 
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where's my table saw?
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it's a "dedicated" motor, multi groove belt

How is your saw powered, direct drive or belt, if it is direct drive would the motor have enough "umph" to resaw larger stock?
It's only 1/3 HP, that's why I was strongly advocating NOT messin' with it in my first response. You can only get one more inch, if even that, and in the world of resawing wood, that's not much. :no:
It's a nice little hobby saw, and will do a lot of fine curved work and even resaw some stock 3 1/2" or so, but it's not a machine for serious woodworking. Save , sell it or gift it and get a 14" model. Even Sears has their 14" on sale, last I heard....
 

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The Man
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Discussion Starter #13
Well fellas I'm sorry to say this is all a moot point. Just tried to resaw some 4.5" cherry this afternoon and the saw bogged down significantly. I may need to upgrade my bandsaw first. As someone said, its a good hobby saw but if I want to do serious work, I need a bigger animal
 

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Well fellas I'm sorry to say this is all a moot point. Just tried to resaw some 4.5" cherry this afternoon and the saw bogged down significantly. I may need to upgrade my bandsaw first. As someone said, its a good hobby saw but if I want to do serious work, I need a bigger animal
what's the blade's tooth set? resawing with a more than 3 tpi blade will bog down a lot of saws during a resaw. there's an excellent probability that your saw is built by the same company that builds rikons.
 

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The Man
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Discussion Starter #15
The blade is a 3/8 6TPI. Problem is the blade is a 70-1/2"... not exactly a standard size. I can't easily find anything bigger
 

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Sawdust Maker
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The saw you have is not for resawing at all. Looks like you just found that out. What you will be resawing willl determine which machine you need. A 14" saw will do some light resawing, but nothing too big. When you are resawing, the wider the blade, the better. Most 14" saws can only support up to a 3/4" blade. I have a Jet 14" saw and it struggles properly tensioning a 1/2" blade and that's with a heavy duty Carter spring installed. I only use my 14" saw for light work and curves. If I need to do any resawing I then resort to my Laguna Italian LT 18 with a 4.5 hp Baldor motor.

It all comes down to you get what you pay for and getting the right tool for the job. If you really want a 14" saw, I would recommend the new Laguna 14/12. It's not cheap, but it will truly do what it says it will do.

Mike Darr
 

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The Man
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Discussion Starter #17
Mike...

Explain a little more to me about what you think I need....

Essentially I build small pieces. For example right now I'm building a replica of an old 1930s style radio out of some 4/4 cherry. 1/2 stock is more than enough for the stucture so I figured save materials by resawing. All of my other tools only "accept" 6" wide boards so I know I'll probably never need to get more aggressive than that.

Any suggestions?
 

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The Man
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Discussion Starter #18
Oh and one more thing... last night I resawed a 3-7/8" wide piece of walnut and it took it fairly well... is cherry just harder than walnut?
 

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Sawdust Maker
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If you are only going to resaw 6" or thinner, then you will be able to get away with most 14" saws. It depends on what kind of quality you are looking from from the cut. The blade you run has a lot to do with that. If you do get a 14", I would make sure it has a 1 hp motor or higher.

I know guys are going to say they have 14" saws they they will say how great they are and all that. Like I said, it really depends on what you want. I own a 14", and a 18" saw. I use the 18" for all my resawing. Blade choice is very important, and a 14" saw is limited as far as blades go.

To answer your question regarding hardness, Walnut is harder than cherry, but not much harder. Walnut can be a difficult wood to resaw. I good quality blade that is tensioned properly is needed to prevent wandering while cutting.

Mike Darr
 
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