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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Are you working by hand or with stones/sanding drums in a drill press?

The Diamond Willow shop in my village might be sanding for 30 days straight. Yup, 30 days.
Here's how they showed me how to save bags of money:

I carve and sand abalone shell and slate rock with stones and drums in my drill press.
You can bet they plug up fast. While running, touch them with a Lee Valley crepe rubber stick
and 99% of the crud comes off, like magic! Even with shell dust, a grind stone will last me more than a year.

Otherwise, I estimate that a pair of 3/4" abalone shell eyes for a wood carving would cost me $200 in grind stones and sanding drums.

You could try to unplug a hand stone with the rubber stick but I predict that it won't be very effective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I work by hand :)

I am considering using baby oil for wet grinding the wood on the rocks.

Or- i might just take a big container of water and do in it- cleaning the stones now and then with a bath towel.......

I THINK it might work :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I am sorry- I am having a bit of trouble understanding the lingo.
I have only worked with wood 1 month now as a hobby :)

I will try to dissect the essense of your sentences- please correct me if I am wrong.


Are you working by hand or with stones/sanding drums in a drill press?

The Diamond Willow shop in my village might be sanding for 30 days straight. Yup, 30 days.
=A local woodworking shop sometimes have their (machines/people)=? sanding for 30 days straight.


I carve and sand abalone shell and slate rock with stones and drums in my drill press.
I use snail shells, and special rocks in my drilling machine.

I am sorry- but where do you put them- i do not understand?

You can bet they plug up fast. While running, touch them with a Lee Valley crepe rubber stick and 99% of the crud comes off, like magic!
=The drilling machine will stop to function due to a passage in it have been blocked by snail crust. But if you touch it with a rubber stick produced by a specific company the passage will clear right away.

I find your statements very confusing- I am sorry.

Could you summarize and dumb it down? Like, "Polishing wood with that will not work!" or "You might try and do *** then it might work"
 

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I use oil stones for sharpening carving chisels. I keep them soaked in water so the water rusts the steel out of the pores. I believe using them on wood the stones would soon get impacted with wood fibers and would stay plugged and soon be useless for your needs. I think sandpaper is your best bet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When i use wet sanding paper after a session put them in water and scrub them a bit with a household pot cleaner to get them "unclugged" for the next session.

I would think i can do the same here- perhaps using steel wood instead.

And even if it would need to be done quite often- it would still be ok for the > 1000 grit ones- because I am pretty sure the amount of wood it would take to fill the grinding stone would pretty much be around the amount of wood i need to remove to make the surface flat.
Then i clean the stone- and repeat for the next handle.

I dont know- that is how I imagined it would work out- especially if I use baby oil as it helps the stone not to suck in the dust.

But as i said I havent tried it yet- and was hoping for experiences......
 

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When i use wet sanding paper after a session put them in water and scrub them a bit with a household pot cleaner to get them "unclugged" for the next session.

I would think i can do the same here- perhaps using steel wood instead.

And even if it would need to be done quite often- it would still be ok for the > 1000 grit ones- because I am pretty sure the amount of wood it would take to fill the grinding stone would pretty much be around the amount of wood i need to remove to make the surface flat.
Then i clean the stone- and repeat for the next handle.

I dont know- that is how I imagined it would work out- especially if I use baby oil as it helps the stone not to suck in the dust.

But as i said I havent tried it yet- and was hoping for experiences......
I think what you are trying to do is new and undiscovered territory. I doubt if anyone has use oil stones on wood so I doubt if there is going to be any hands on experience. I was taught by a Bavarian woodcarver to never to use any kind of oil on natural stones. Using them with steel he said the steel would mix with the oil and fill the pores of the stone so the longer you used them the finer and finer grit the working ability of the stone would get. I have taken him at his word and many of the stones I purchased in the late 1970's work as well as they did when they were new using them with water only. You will have to try it on wood for a while and let us know how it goes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Honered brothers, I humble accept this quest to investigate the unknown. I will do my upmost best to accomplish this magnificent deed, and you can trust upon me not to dash your hopes.
I will report back with my experiences for all the types of stones i have purchased-comparing them to specific grid sand papers.

I will find the optimal method to avoid or remove clogging, be that using steel wool, baby oil, ethanol, another stone, a steel file, or something enterily else and report back.

I will measure how many mm the stones can dissolve a standard piece of wood on 1 minute, and compare after more use.

I will measure stone shrinkage compared to usage, and record it in an Excel Spreadsheet, that i will later convert to pdf and html, and post here.

Or the stones might just suck- so i will throw them out the window.
 
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