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I Have a craftsman wood lathe model 113.23881. I'm wanting to get an expanding mandrel. Does the mandrel just slide into the spindle? All the sizes that I have seen are to big to fit in the spindle. It's about 15/32 hole.

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I'm not sure what you mean by "expanding mandrel" ... what is the purpose of it? (as in, what do you intend to make using it?)

PennState Industries sell a "closed end mandrel" which expands by turning a lock-nut on the end (LINK) -- is this what you mean?

My guess is that your lathe has a #1 Morse Taper, which is usually 0.475" at the open end (15/32 is 0.468" so that's close to what you measured.)
 

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My guess is that the hole is a #1 Morse taper. many older Craftsman lathes had that size hole. You can find lots of accessories to fit in that hole. Check with www.pennstateind.com They usually carry some #1 morse taper drives, and other accessories.
 

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I'm wanting to make a duck call. I will be drilling a 5/8 hole for the barrel.
That size is much larger than pen mandrels I have seen.

You could use a #1 MT pen mandrel like the link duncsuss if you can find the appropriate bushings to get you to 5/8in.
 

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Dave is right, that's much larger than the ones that PennState make for pens.

I can think of 2 possibilities.

(1) a 4-jaw scroll chuck fitted with "pin jaws", which might be what you meant by "expanding mandrel" in your first post; these typically mount to the headstock by screwing onto the spindle (not by fitting inside the Morse taper). The problem with this idea is that they typically require a 1" hole to fit inside before you open the jaws up a little to grip the blank

(2) a "pin chuck" -- this is a rod the diameter of the hole you're going to push it into. There's a flat area ground away on one side, and a little steel pin the diameter of the ground-away-amount is placed on the flat. The rod and the pin are together pushed into the hole, then when they are twisted the pin rolls to one side and wedges against the workpiece.

Of course, now you need some way to hold the other end of the pin chuck rod in the headstock of the lathe -- a regular Jacobs (drill) chuck, or a 4-jaw scroll chuck, or some other method that's available to you.
 

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I turn calls all the time on a pen mandrel but I learned fast that the bushings you buy aren't that good at keeping things in line. To fix that I took a piece of hardwood drilled a hole the size of the mandrel through it then put it on the mandrel. I turned two cones out of it that can then be used as opposing pieces to hold the blank and align it to center. When they get worn simply turn two more.

If you do this it is simple slide on your first cone then the blank then the second cone and add whatever bushings you need to take up space on the mandrel and tighten the knurled nut.

The cones are great since you can use them for blanks with different sized holes. 5/8 for duck 3/4 for deer and 7/8 for goose.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I like those. Do you have one? My problem is trying to find something with a tapered end to fit in my headstock and still hold the call with 5/8 hole.
 

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