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In The Basement
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I can't play with the big boys yet- still with the contractor saw,, wishing I had a cabinet saw but have limited space in my parents basement- so decided to soup up my table saw in the mean time. It's just a $170 Craftsman vibrator included with a flimsy throat plate. But I cut a lot of 1/8" thick baltic birch, the problem was the fence had a small gap right where it meets the table. Now the wood I bolted fence has no gap. So now I am happy and have been cutting great even some 1/2" thick poplar boxes. The zero clearance really makes a quality cut. Thanks for listening









 

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In The Basement
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No you are correct, I need to prop it up a mm on one corner. Plan on putting some 30 minute epoxy and then grinding it down to make level. I took off a little too much wood with the chisel because of they weird throat boarder on the table top.

Actually wish I did this SEVERAL months ago, my saw was dangerous before the mods- kick back city
 

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Nice set up you have. Looks like a nice blade too. Freud? The insert came out really well. Have you built a crosscut sled yet? That will really help with your crosscuts.

I did notice that you have what appears to be a 60 tooth crosscut blade. You are not using that and the ZCI to rip with right? On the ZCI, epoxy will work, but a lot of guys use hot melt glue and then use a block to push the insert flush with the table. You might want to think about waxing the metal support for the ZCI so the glue stays with the insert itself. Also you should put a pin, screw, .. at the far end of the ZCI where the blade comes up through the table so that the insert can't lift up. Look at you original plate to see how they did it. Mine just has a little pin that slides under the top.
 

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No you are correct, I need to prop it up a mm on one corner. Plan on putting some 30 minute epoxy and then grinding it down to make level. I took off a little too much wood with the chisel because of they weird throat boarder on the table top.

Actually wish I did this SEVERAL months ago, my saw was dangerous before the mods- kick back city
you can place some screws on the underside, where it will sit on some tabs or a ledge, to give the insert some adjustability to level it with your table top. this also gives the adjustability for later as the plywood swells and shrinks through the seasons.

Just remember to remove it when tilting the blade!!! one of my most frequent shop errors.
 

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you can place some screws on the underside, where it will sit on some tabs or a ledge, to give the insert some adjustability to level it with your table top. this also gives the adjustability for later as the plywood swells and shrinks through the seasons.

Just remember to remove it when tilting the blade!!! one of my most frequent shop errors.
Agree with you fully. Screws are the way to go. Unfortunately it appears that his saw was designed with a really thin throat plate and I don't think it would work in this case. You can tell because he had to rabbet the edges of his ZCI to flush it with the table top.

Glad you brought up the point for all the rest of us. Sorry for any confusion I may have created.
 

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No you are correct, I need to prop it up a mm on one corner. Plan on putting some 30 minute epoxy and then grinding it down to make level. I took off a little too much wood with the chisel because of they weird throat boarder on the table top.

I read this somewhere recently about leveling the plate. If you have a hot glue gun put a dab on the four corners and push the plate into it until it's flush. The glue will stick to the wood and not the metal and it creates a shim the thickness that you need. I have never tried it, only passing it on to you.
 

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In The Basement
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Great tips. Correct I did rabbet the sides and there is just under 3/16" thickness to play with, so not sure counter bored machine screws on each end would work. I am going to look at it though...the hot glue sounds plausible, maybe I will try that too. It's pretty flush with the table already so nothing dramatic is necessary.

The blad is a 60T Diablo X I think...I've been using it for ripping...I assume you are suggesting I step down to a 45T for ripping?

I might actually make another one with a wide clearance for dados and tilting. The reason I made this was to have a solid plate that was flush with the table, the zero clearance cut was something I forgot about until I was rolling the blade up into it
 

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Great tips. Correct I did rabbet the sides and there is just under 3/16" thickness to play with, so not sure counter bored machine screws on each end would work. I am going to look at it though...the hot glue sounds plausible, maybe I will try that too. It's pretty flush with the table already so nothing dramatic is necessary.
I would try small fh wood screws

don't have any? maybe you need to start a mayonnaise jar collection like I have. before throwing anything out, I remove as many reusable screws as possible. family makes fun of me - but I seldom need to buy screws. start young, as it takes years
 

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I can't play with the big boys yet- still with the contractor saw,, wishing I had a cabinet saw but have limited space in my parents basement- so decided to soup up my table saw in the mean time. ......
FTR, i wouldn't under-rate that contractor saw. look at many of the projects done in WOOD magazine. almost invariably, they show parts being fabricated on a ridgid 3650/60, a contractor saw. unless one is in a commercial environment with long, heavy use duty cycles are the rule, a good 1.5 hp contractor saw can be successfully used for fine woodworking. 3 hp contractor saws don't make one a good woodworker all by themselves.
 

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In The Basement
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Good to know about the teeth count- I feel 25 teeth would show rough cuts in the side of the board?

I have already started my screw collection. I am only 25 but I have a few plastic case full of different screws (machine/wood), nuts, bolts, etc...and it's only going to grow from here!

I'm beginning to think the saw I have is a really good saw especially after the mods I did. I have some projects I will be starting over the winter and i think the tools I have currently will really come in handy.
 

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aaronhl said:
Good to know about the teeth count- I feel 25 teeth would show rough cuts in the side of the board?

I have already started my screw collection. I am only 25 but I have a few plastic case full of different screws (machine/wood), nuts, bolts, etc...and it's only going to grow from here!

I'm beginning to think the saw I have is a really good saw especially after the mods I did. I have some projects I will be starting over the winter and i think the tools I have currently will really come in handy.
I break all the rules on saw blades because I like to sand less and joint right off the table saw. More teeth and less sanding is to my liking.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 
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