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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am pretty new to using epoxy and looking for some feedback on what to do after the pour to swirl, use heat to get rid of bubbles etc. I get rid of most bubbles during set up time but once cured it seems like there are little spots under the epoxy. Am I heating too much to try to get rid of bubbles?

The mixing of epoxy, tinting etc of ok, would like to know about mixing multiple colours.

Is there a space on this forum just for this topic?

Thanks
Paul
 

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This is area is fine - post your questions as they occur in one thread and you'll be good-to-go.
The torch is okay for "warm" blowing air - don't think of it as a heat source. You can get the same effect by blowing through a soda straw - but that takes a little practice so you don't accidently blow saliva onto the epoxy (or other finishes).
 

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I am pretty new to using epoxy and looking for some feedback on what to do after the pour to swirl, use heat to get rid of bubbles etc. I get rid of most bubbles during set up time but once cured it seems like there are little spots under the epoxy. Am I heating too much to try to get rid of bubbles?

The mixing of epoxy, tinting etc of ok, would like to know about mixing multiple colours.

Is there a space on this forum just for this topic?

Thanks
Paul
It sounds like it's probably air escaping from the wood during the cure. If you're not already doing this, I believe you want to seal the wood with epoxy before you do the actual pour. This will trap the air in the wood so that the only bubbles in the equation are generated by the epoxy itself.
 

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We pour epoxy directly on the unfinished wood.

You can look up "Jakobe Furniture manufacturer marvels" on youtube and you'll see it being poured and heated..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It sounds like it's probably air escaping from the wood during the cure. If you're not already doing this, I believe you want to seal the wood with epoxy before you do the actual pour. This will trap the air in the wood so that the only bubbles in the equation are generated by the epoxy itself.
Ok, will try sealing the wood on a few and see what happens. I am assuming you would use the fast curing epoxy for that step.
 

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Ok, will try sealing the wood on a few and see what happens. I am assuming you would use the fast curing epoxy for that step.
Yeah, I think you can use whatever is compatible with the epoxy which could even be polyurethane but a quick curing epoxy of the same brand will probably seal the air in better and will be more compatible.
 
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