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· Smart and Cool
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Can you determine if there is any reaction(heat)?

What product did you use and what is the cure time? What is the temp in your work area?

I wouldn't add anymore until you determine that what you have is kicking off, if it isn't hardening then adding more will just make more of a mess to fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Can you determine if there is any reaction(heat)?

What product did you use and what is the cure time? What is the temp in your work area?

I wouldn't add anymore until you determine that what you have is kicking off, if it isn't hardening then adding more will just make more of a mess to fix.
I used designer epoxy with a 72 hour cure time. I went ahead and added the extra so will see what happens. It was still in a very liquid state although about as thick as gravy. Work area temp is abut 22c.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Assuming it's not hardened because it is fresh and that it's not enough hardener then the sooner you add a second pour the better.
Yea I have followed the same process the last 5 times and it isn't that its not hardening and it is still pretty fresh considering it has a 72 hr cure time. Only been working with epoxy for couple of months so appreciate the feedback.
 

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Since you won’t get an answer from the manufacturer today, I’d bet on you having done it right. I would follow the suggestion to do your second pour now. If it is still curing the two layers will chemically bond. If by chance first pour was a bad pour (wrong mix or poor mixing) you’ll have a mess to clean up either way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Since you won’t get an answer from the manufacturer today, I’d bet on you having done it right. I would follow the suggestion to do your second pour now. If it is still curing the two layers will chemically bond. If by chance first pour was a bad pour (wrong mix or poor mixing) you’ll have a mess to clean up either way.
Thanks, def wasn't going to hear from manufacturer so I did as you suggest, it seem to mix in well and I am pretty sure I didn't get the mix wrong. Thanks for the feedback.
 

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Curious Question: Why such a long cure time?
the epoxies meant for deeper pours (>1/2”) are formulated for long set times to reduce the heat buildup caused during the curing process. When I pour a couple inches thick for a tabletop, it’s at least three days before you can touch it without leaving an impression.
Mike Hawkins
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
the epoxies meant for deeper pours (>1/2”) are formulated for long set times to reduce the heat buildup caused during the curing process. When I pour a couple inches thick for a tabletop, it’s at least three days before you can touch it without leaving an impression.
Mike Hawkins
I have been finding the same, usually about 24 hrs before I can do swirls.
 

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I didn't pour enough epoxy in my charcuterie board and it is still not firm can I add more at this point or would I need to let it harden and then do so?

Thanks
What is the set time (before you can't pour it) for your epoxy? How many hours for a full set?

Assuming you mixed the correct amount of hardener and resin together you should be OK to add more epoxy on top. Depending on the particular epoxy and it's set time, you should have about 24 hours to recoat. I routinely do this making glass & epoxy parts for my RC model airplanes without issue.

Ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What is the set time (before you can't pour it) for your epoxy? How many hours for a full set?

Assuming you mixed the correct amount of hardener and resin together you should be OK to add more epoxy on top. Depending on the particular epoxy and it's set time, you should have about 24 hours to recoat. I routinely do this making glass & epoxy parts for my RC model airplanes without issue.

Ken
Curing time is 72hrs, and I did have the right mix, 2:1. While it was about the consistency of gravy I topped it up and stirred it in. Comes out of the molds today but seems to have hardened ok. Tks for the feed back.
 

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Sounds like you're already past the point of no return (and you made the right choice) but wanted to drop this in here for future reference. I've watched a lot of Blacktail Studios on YouTube (he does a lot of epoxy tables and gives a lot of good info), and have learned that when you pour a second layer, you want to do exactly what you did. You might want to wait a little longer but I think as long as it's still tacky, you're fine to pour the second layer. You can also wait until it cures enough to sand, sand it with something like 220, clean it up, then pour again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sounds like you're already past the point of no return (and you made the right choice) but wanted to drop this in here for future reference. I've watched a lot of Blacktail Studios on YouTube (he does a lot of epoxy tables and gives a lot of good info), and have learned that when you pour a second layer, you want to do exactly what you did. You might want to wait a little longer but I think as long as it's still tacky, you're fine to pour the second layer. You can also wait until it cures enough to sand, sand it with something like 220, clean it up, then pour again.
Great, hasn't cured yet so am relieved to hear this. tks
 

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Sounds like you're already past the point of no return (and you made the right choice) but wanted to drop this in here for future reference. I've watched a lot of Blacktail Studios on YouTube (he does a lot of epoxy tables and gives a lot of good info), and have learned that when you pour a second layer, you want to do exactly what you did. You might want to wait a little longer but I think as long as it's still tacky, you're fine to pour the second layer. You can also wait until it cures enough to sand, sand it with something like 220, clean it up, then pour again.
MY opinion and as I stated, if the first layer is not completely cured then a second layer will chemically bond to the first. If you wait for a full cure before adding the second layer, then all you have is a mechanical bond which is much less durable than the mentioned chemical bond.
Or maybe I'm misinterpreting what you are saying about what you said about sanding. To me you need a full cure before you are able to sand.

Ken
 
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