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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am assembling the legs on a coat rack I made out of a small tree trunk. On two of the legs I basically drilled a dowel into the trunk, then glued it into the legs. Held well, but the other two have too much of a gap. The drill bit I used wasn't great and made it too loose for wood glue.

What am I looking at for something that will hold this pretty well structurally. I have Titebond III wood glue. Is there something I can use with that? Or will I be better off with some sort of an epoxy? If so, what kind can I buy and what to mix it with?

I saw somewhere that there is an epoxy that you apply to the wood thinly, then you apply another epoxy which bonds those two together.

I'm thinking maybe around 1/8 inch thick at some spots, maybe a little more.
 

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I work on my boat and frequent a couple of boating forums. Epoxy is a mainstay for marine projects, so I don't see why it wouldn't work in a household application. Seems like thickened epoxy would solve your problem. Take a look at the West Systems site - They have info on applications for their epoxy products and the thickeners that work best for specific uses. You'd be looking at a viscosity approaching that of peanut butter for your application.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I work on my boat and frequent a couple of boating forums. Epoxy is a mainstay for marine projects, so I don't see why it wouldn't work in a household application. Seems like thickened epoxy would solve your problem. Take a look at the West Systems site - They have info on applications for their epoxy products and the thickeners that work best for specific uses. You'd be looking at a viscosity approaching that of peanut butter for your application.
It looks like I'll want West System 406. I can get more than enough on eBay. Is that all I need? That's the whole kit?
 

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So I need 105 Resin, 106 Hardner and 406 Filler.
That would do it. The 106 hardner gives more working time than the 105 hardner. For your application looks like 406 filler would be good. 404 also looks appropriate.

You'll also need a way to measure relatively small quantities of hardner and resin accurately - I use a small electronic scale made by West - they also have small graduated plastic cups that would work. Plus some old popsicle sticks for mixing/applying and some latex/pvc/vinyl gloves to protect your skin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah I have an ammo reloading scale that will work. It looks like this won't be too cheap unfortunately. I feel I isn't need much of what I end up buying.
 

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Yeah I have an ammo reloading scale that will work. It looks like this won't be too cheap unfortunately. I feel I isn't need much of what I end up buying.
Here's an alternative, that cuts down on the array of stuff to pull together. West sells a thickened epoxy in a standard size (22 oz.) caulk tube. It dispenses from the tube in the proper ratio and comes with a nozzle that does the mixing. You can also dispense it without the nozzle into a cup and mix with a stick. It may be thick enough to use right out of the tube. If not, you could thicken it some more with some sawdust. Total cost: about $22. It's called Six10.

The unused stuff in the tube keeps for a long time (I've had some for 6 months) so if you had other projects in the future you could use the remainder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Here's an alternative, that cuts down on the array of stuff to pull together. West sells a thickened epoxy in a standard size (22 oz.) caulk tube. It dispenses from the tube in the proper ratio and comes with a nozzle that does the mixing. You can also dispense it without the nozzle into a cup and mix with a stick. It may be thick enough to use right out of the tube. If not, you could thicken it some more with some sawdust. Total cost: about $22. It's called Six10.

The unused stuff in the tube keeps for a long time (I've had some for 6 months) so if you had other projects in the future you could use the remainder.
So I should mix that in a cup with the 406 filler? Or I wouldn't need to?
 

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another option is drill a hole to suit a larger dowel and then re-drill your original size with a better bit once it has dried in place
 

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Read the info on the different types of fillers sold by West System. Different fillers are used for different purposes. Sawdust substantially weakens the epoxy mix and is used mainly as a fairing compound by those that don't want to spend the money on a fairing compound. If it's strength that you want, buy the proper filler. These fillers should more properly be referred to as 'thickeners'.
Using the proper thickeners would be more akin to adding aggregate to cement to make concrete. It's not just a filler, it's a strengthener.
 

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Read the info on the different types of fillers sold by West System. Different fillers are used for different purposes. Sawdust substantially weakens the epoxy mix and is used mainly as a fairing compound by those that don't want to spend the money on a fairing compound. If it's strength that you want, buy the proper filler. These fillers should more properly be referred to as 'thickeners'.
Using the proper thickeners would be more akin to adding aggregate to cement to make concrete. It's not just a filler, it's a strengthener.
From the Rot Doctor's (another epoxy company) website: "For extremely high strength, we suggest using our Layup and Laminating Resin mixed with Fine Sawdust to the desired consistency."
 
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