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puffessional Scrabbleist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm making an entryway cabinet for one door of our home. I've been slowly putting together the wood and finally have what I wanted so I finished gluing it all up. I need to go over this with some 80 grit to level it and get rid of a little wood "flash" where two pieces meet. A few minutes with a sander and this will really begin taking shape. Tomorrow.

The piece on the table saw is almost eight feet long and will be what one sees when they come in the house. This "deck" will be at waist level and will accent some cabinets below. The side away from the entry will house a 28 inch flat screen aquarium. Above the table on the opposing side will be a panel inlaid with a "rhombus" structure to appear 3-d.

I don't follow any plans. I sketch the idea on a tablet and work from there. I'm not sure how I will treat the lower portion, below the deck or the top piece that connects to the ceiling. But I have this picture in my mind...

The oak plywood against the wall is the rest of it. I have some pieces cut already but there is a lot more to do before this takes on a recognizable form. The entire thing will have some accents inlays but nothing extravagant like the deck.

Woods around the deck are RW Cedar, walnut and zebrawood. The slats are made of red oak interspersed with ash. The two should blend in to create a subtle contrast. The oak will be reddish and the ash will be whitish. There is a pattern to the pieces. You can see it now but it will be more apparent as it gets further in.

I'l;l post updates. I have been working on the deck for about six months so cannot show how the marquetry is constructed but I will post regular progress photos.

TonyM.
 

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puffessional Scrabbleist
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155 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wood movement

The slats are not glued except for a tad to hold in place. They kinda float in there and are held in place with a 3-4 degree angle and a bit of epoxy.

This shelf/deck is about two inches thick. I piggy-backed two sheets of oak plywood to get this extra bulk so I could mess with the layout. Before laying the slats down I cut two 1/2" wide 1/4" inch deep grooves on each row. I laid a thick epoxy layer in the grooves and embedded the slats in them. I've done this before and it works quite well.

There isn't all that much clearance along the edges but enough for movement. I planned on scraping this down at least 3/32 and then sanding to 600 and then doing a bit of French polishing on only this part of the unit. I will probably wait a bit because there is a lot of work to do and having the excess on there now will protect the wood while I move it around the shop.

I look forward to the finishing phase of this. Anytime I get a flat surface to mess with I crank my stereo up and get into a "Zen-like" state. "Wax on...Wax off".

TonyM
 

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puffessional Scrabbleist
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155 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
switching tracks

though up close the center panels are little too busy for me as this point.


Thomas-
I've been thinking, and looking. and more thinking and looking. I agree with your statement. All I have to do is flip it and go again on the other side. I will begin again when I figure out what I want to create. I already have some wood ready to to go in but the pieces will have to be trimmed. Thanks for the insight. I was trying to copy a table I saw in Hawaii one time. Theirs was done with mango and light koa. It had a few more feet of length to it and gave a very nice image but this won't replicate it. I'm not sure it would be worth continuing unless it's a "keeper" and it is definitely too busy.

TonyM
 
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