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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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A coworker mentioned she was having a tree removed from her front yard. Of course I had to stop by to see what it was. A nice elm, mostly punky, but I found a couple nice pieces. Got it home and chopped it up. I should have enough for quite a few projects. I haven't turned much elm. Would it better to turn thin forms or rough out some blanks to dry?
 

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I've worked with 3 species of elm that were very different from each other. Any idea what kind this is?

My process evolves constantly but recently I've decided it works well for me to rough out the whole load of wood I bring home and then if I want to finish one green I can just pick one out and chuck it back up. That way I know all the wood is processed and safe whether I use it now or later. Otherwise I'm likely to let some of the logs sit too long and end up with more waste.

I look forward to seeing what you come up with. You do nice work. What area are you from anyway?
 

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Thank you. I'm not sure of the type of elm. It's got some very dark heart wood surrounded by light colored sap wood. It smells pretty earthy. I'm gonna try a hollow form in a few days to show off the contrast. I'm in east texas.
 

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EastexToolJunky said:
Thank you. I'm not sure of the type of elm. It's got some very dark heart wood surrounded by light colored sap wood. It smells pretty earthy. I'm gonna try a hollow form in a few days to show off the contrast. I'm in east texas.
Now you're talkin. Can't wait to see it. And I was guessing East Texas, just curious what part. Cedar Elm and American Elm are the only two I've seen here in N Texas.
 

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If it was mine I would rough turn it asap. I turned about 30 bowls from wet elm last year or later and have finished turned a few. Dense hard wood to turn wet but even harder wood when dry. They dried well with no cracking or checking. Think mine was American Red Elm. Beautiful stuff and in my location here in Indianapolis Indiana it is very stable wood.
 
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