Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Hobbyist
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So for 50 bucks, I got this ol' Reliant dust collector. The thing worked fine as demonstrated by the seller, however I'm concerned about how much energy it draws. Right now it's set up for 120 volts and the guy I bought it from did mention that it draws about amps. At the same time, the label says it draws 12 amps when wired in at 230 volts. I know very little about electrical so I thought I might ask a couple advance questions before I call the electrician.

  1. Should I try plugging it in (normal 120 volt) and see if it trips a circuit?
  2. Can *I rewire it for 230 volts and simply plug it into my Dryer outlet (which I think is 230 volts) with the correct type of plug attached.

Any and all suggestions welcome.

Thanks,

Greg

*meaning I would have an electrician do it!
 

Attachments

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
Unless you have a 30 amp 110 outlet it won't work.

I would have a 15 amp 220 outlet put in by the electrician and have him check the motor wiring while he's there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
Unless you have a 30 amp 110 outlet it won't work.

I would have a 15 amp 220 outlet put in by the electrician and have him check the motor wiring while he's there.
+1 on both suggestions. that's a good looking collector.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gthec

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
You can change the wiring on that motor for 230V.

If you don't have the manual for it I'm sure you can find the diagram for that specific motor online.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,582 Posts
It won't hurt anything to try it on a 110v outlet. It will either work or trip the breaker. The bottom line though is it would run better on 220v.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
epicfail48 said:
Itll trip the breaker near immediately. 120 draws twice the amperage as 240, so unless you have a 30 amp 120 line, it wont work. Want to know how i know that?

It may not. My DC draws 18 amps and is on a 15 amp circuit.

I think because there's really no load on the motor there not drawing that many amps?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,213 Posts
It may not. My DC draws 18 amps and is on a 15 amp circuit.

I think because there's really no load on the motor there not drawing that many amps?
It also depends upon the efficiency rating of the motor. Yours may be a higher rated motor therefore drawing fewer amps.

Well, I was trying to paste a table here and it will just not format properly.

George
 

·
Hobbyist
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would not attempt to run it on 110V. The wire is not sized for that amperage in a typical house.
Tom
Hey TomC,
Do you mean the wire size of the of the cord attached to the collector or do you mean the house wiring in general?
Thanks
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
If your dust collector draws 18 amps and it's not tripping your 15 amp breaker you have a problem with your breaker. Get that fixed before it burns your house down.

There is no possible way a 24 amp rated motor will run on a standard 15 amp circuit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,582 Posts
The 24 amps should be at start up and should drop way down after it gets running. If the breaker isn't soft it can withstand a power surge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
Circuit breakers exist to protect the house wiring. Like Steve said, it won't hurt anything to try it. If the breaker pops, then you will know. Also, residential circuit breakers do not pop immediately when they go a little above their nominal value. Think of them as "slow-blow" fuses. If you are on the hairy edge, it might pop the breaker after a couple of minutes, though. Briefly exceeding the rated load won't hurt your wiring.

When a motor starts up, it pulls a higher amount of current until it reaches it's normal operating level. So you might find it works on a 15 or 20A circuit. But any additional load on that breaker will very likely pop it. Also, the current pulled by a motor increases as the load on the motor increases so you might find that it works ok without being hooked up but when using it to actually collect dust you may pop the breaker. You could test that by restricting the intake on the DC.

It would definitely be better to switch the motor to 220 - it will run cooler and you won't have to worry about popping the breaker at an inopportune moment.

edit- I see steve said the same thing. I posted about 3 minutes after...
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
The motor rating is not its start up rating, the 24 amps is its normal draw rating to provide 2hp on 110.

I think we all agree however that the best course of action is to have a 220 circuit run and convert the motor over to 220.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,359 Posts
Unless you have a 30 amp 110 outlet it won't work.

I would have a 15 amp 220 outlet put in by the electrician and have him check the motor wiring while he's there.
Good advice on the electrician to check things, but I would want to see a 20 amp 240 v circuit on #12 wire. 12 amps draw on a 15 amp circuit is cutting it real close.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
12 amp draw on a 15 amp circuit is well within its capabilities. 12 amps is only 80% of its rated use. Wiring is rated for a reason, no "extra" margin is needed in a small home shop.
 

·
Hobbyist
Joined
·
157 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for your help folks. So, to stay on the safe side, I have an electrician coming on Friday to advise. I also need j boxes installed to take care of my to my 120 volt saw and jointer, etc. Will report back on the results. Thanks again.

Greg
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
If you have the electrician coming, and need to run new boxes anyhow, have you considered switching the saw to 220 if it can be? My saw recovers much quicker and cuts better on 220 than it did on 110.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,359 Posts
12 amp draw on a 15 amp circuit is well within its capabilities. 12 amps is only 80% of its rated use. Wiring is rated for a reason, no "extra" margin is needed in a small home shop.
Let's agree 15 is "adequate". Now let me ask how many shops have 15 amp circuits on their 120V lines? Most of the power tools - routers, drills, sanders, miter saws, etc, would all run "adequately" on 15 amp circuits. I don't think I have a 120V power tool in my shop that wouldn't run on a 15 amp circuit. Do I have any 15 amp circuits? Nope. My one 240V circuit is 20 amp, yet I don't have any tools that even approach that. The biggest is my shaper, and it's only about 7-8 amps. Yet the cost differential between a 15 and a 20 amp circuit is peanuts, 120 or 240 volts. JMHO.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
I know the cost is minimal, but if your going to do 20 why not do 30, or 50...

Cause it's just not needed....ratings are there for a reason.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top