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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I researched how to turn an egg, and successfully turned and finished one from a chunk of cherry. Since then, I have made two more attempts and cannot seam to turn the shape anymore. The main issue? When i get down to the final shape I always have a catch when turning one of the ends (still in between centers). This absolutely ruins the egg.

The tool I am using is a spindle gouge from Benjamins best pen turning kit. Is this the wrong tool to use? Perhaps a detail gouge or skew instead?

First Egg



Here is a failed egg before the catch happened, which put a huge gouge in the side and blew the top apart. The other egg fail was flame box elder that also had a huge gouge in the side and blew the top apart



Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Chris,
eggs can be great fun to turn, but also very frustrating at times. Getting the shape right is battle number one. The easiest way for me it to take a good look at a real egg before I start. Some guys make templates, not a bad idea either. I have turned some with a skew. It works well if you feel halfway comfortable with your skew. If not, you'll probably destroy more blanks. 3/8" spindle gouge should work well. Not sure where your catches were occuring by the pics, but you have to be sure when rotating the tool while getting to the end of the egg that you maintain contact with the bevel of the tool. Also be very carefull when you get right to the end the top side of your tool doesn't come in contact with the waste piece of the blank. You may wan't to use the skew just to finish the last 1/2" of the cut. Just take your time and be aware of where the tip and bevel of the tool are at all times. No real secrets here.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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Could also be related to the differing grain orientations on the glued up blank.
 

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Is it a "screw thread catch"? That's what always trips me up at the final couple of passes when I'm turning beads.

In my case, I believe it's because I don't rotate the handle far enough. It allows the cutting edge to switch to "above the nose", and that edge is angled backwards ... when it catches, the tool digs in and cuts a screw thread back up the workpiece.

HTH
 

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Yes, that looks a lot like what I produce.

I don't know if what might correct my problem would also work for you, since we may be getting the same catch but for different reasons.

The only thing I'm confident to say is that in my case it's a result of not presenting the tool correctly to the workpiece -- maybe the angle of the tool, maybe the rotation of the tool, maybe I'm cutting above (or on, or below) the centerline ... :huh:

Best I can suggest is starting with a long piece of wood you don't mind turning into shavings and practice making the end round till you figure it out.

If you can, stop the lathe quickly when you get a catch and try placing the gouge into the position where the whole catastrophe began ... turn by hand and follow the path of the edge. "Forensic analysis" might reveal what went wrong.
 
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