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I am building all new cabinets for our kitchen using PB melamine with maple-look surface. The face frame will be hard maple. The maple is S2S, so I need to cut it to width and finish the edges.

Will I be able to get a good edge by cutting it with the table saw and then sanding with a belt sander/random orbit sander/finishing sander? Or do I need to look for a used jointer on craigslist? I am concerned about the ends of the stiles where the rails meet it, these need to be exactly square to the top surface. Sometimes when sanding the edge you can make it slightly off 90 degrees. I have a 6" x 48" stationary belt sander also.

Any thoughts?

Also, I was going to replace my flex-drive craftsman table saw (I dropped the fence and broke a casting) with a sawstop contractor model but I can't afford it right now with the remodelling costs. In previous searches everyone recommeds the Delta T2 fence, but it looks unavailable now. What would be the fence of choice now for a craftsman saw?

Thanks
Steve
 

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Depending on your saw/blade/and you, you can get a pretty good edge with a saw cut. But invariably it won't be a surface that you can just apply a finish to. If you cut your frames, and they are the same width, stack them together on edge, clamp them, on a flat surface, and use a block sander. it won't take much, and you'll likely wind up with smooth square edges.






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Even with a jointer you will have mill marks on the wood which can show up in the staining. These marks come out with sanding faster than saw blade scratches. A couple swipes with a sanding block usually eliminate the milling marks from a jointer. Jointing the edges will give a very tight glue joint, also.

If you buy an expensive glue line rip blade for your table saw you can get really good edges right from the table saw. Look at this link...
https://www.google.com/search?q=glu...sm=93&espv=210&q=glue+line+rip+blade&tbm=shop

If you buy a jointer it needs to be set up accurately and have sharp blades or it will only create headaches. Here is another suggestion. If I am making a bunch of stile and rail material, I will cut it 1/16" over size and run it on edge through my planer, taking 1/32" off each side. If done properly, this will give you perfect edges and exact final dimension. You can run several boards through the planer at the same time. I stagger the ends when I feed the boards into the planer to prevent snipe. On my outfeed table, I have a slight incline to prevent snipe as the boards leave the planer.
 

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I replaced the fence on my Craftsman TS with an Incra fence system. If you want the old fence system, pay for shipping and you can have it.
 
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