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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's your Thoughts on these? I used some last night and wow they cut nice and never have to sharpen just replace the tips.
 

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EWT are easy to use, as the name implies.

They are all scrapers. No bevel to rub, so they do may not leave as good a surface.

I have a RusDemka made tool which takes the EWT circular cutter. I use this now and again, but I prefer my spindle gouges, skews, Hunter Hercules.

No sharpening, although I do not find it difficult to sharpen my turning tools.

Quick learning curve.

They are a bit more expensive compared to some other tools.
 

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I finally admitted it to myself..... I really, really, really stink at sharpening.

So, for me, the Easy Wood Tools are a great alternative. That said, while the carbide tips hold an edge for a long time, they don't start out with as keen an edge as HSS. I didn't realize it until I read a previous post by Dave, but they are scrapers and require a really light touch with a very new cutter to minimize tearout. I say minimize, because I don't think it can be eliminated. It could be that I'm a very new turner, but I haven't yet gotten a turned surface that doesn't require a fairly considerable amount of sanding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm also new to woodturning and they just seem the way to go. I really don't want to spend the money on stones grinders and angle gadgets when I can just buy tips. I have heard the tips stay sharp for a long time, didn't know about taking it easy when they are new. Thanks for the tips.
 

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I'm also new to woodturning and they just seem the way to go. I really don't want to spend the money on stones grinders and angle gadgets when I can just buy tips. I have heard the tips stay sharp for a long time.
Carbide is not as "sharp" as a newly honed HSS edge, but it keeps its edge longer than HSS.

It does not keep its edge for a long time. Depending on the wood, the density of the grain, grain orientation, etc, a tool edge may become dull sooner than you may appreciate. I have a Black Locust bowl blank which dulled my HSS tools fast. Several honings needed to get this round.

I have scrapers and use them, but there are times when scraping does not work as well as a good cutting edge.

I recently cored a walnut bowl blank. The outer bowl, seen on the left in this picture has long, stringy walnut fibres.

Bowl_coring_walnut_middle_1_1821.jpg

I tried to clean these up with my Hercules Hunter which is a carbide cutter and it did not do so well. I tried my scraper, it was not making a dent.

Only my HSS Henry Taylor Superflute bowl gouge would clean up this surface. I think the edge design/shape added to being able to clean these up.

Bowl_walnut_outer_inside_cleaned_1828.jpg

I personally prefer Hunter carbide cutter tools over the EWT.
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...Y&Store_Code=packard&Category_Code=tools-hunt

Sorby now offer a tool with replaceable scraper/cutters like EWT, but less expensive than individual EWT tools.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...e_Code=packard&Category_Code=tools-srby-turnm
 

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Wow thanks Dave now my head is really spinning. What to buy? ��
I am not trying to make your head spin, just advising that if you want the carbide type tools, there are several options on the market.

If I were starting out and wanted to use the carbide style tools, I would look hard at the Sorby system since it gives you the choice of HSS, a Titanium Nitride coated HSS (which may not make much difference) and Carbide. One handle different shafts, so changing tools would be fast.

If I wanted the best carbide cutter, I would go with the Hunter tools since this design does cut, and you can rub the bevel to polish the wood.

Edit - sanding.

Whatever tools I use, I end up with some sanding. I have recently learned that slower speeds can be preferred for sanding than for turning, since slower means less heat.

I also heard by my local Woodturning club to reverse the lathe between grits as a way of removing the turning/sanding marks.

I have started to slow down for sanding, e.g., 500 or 750 rpm, it certainly does reduce the heat. Let the abrasive do the work. Light pressure.

I have not reversed the chuck since I would have to install the lock screw, and then I would likely forget when I need to remove the chuck. This happened with the walnut coring. Used by friends chuck, he wanted to set the lock screw, then he forgot to undo this when he attempted to remove the chuck. Damaged a portion of the first thread.
 

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This has been discussed before, so you can find more talk here if you search it out. Here's my .02:

Carbide tools have their applications, just like every other tool. Each has its plusses and minuses. If you want to buy carbide because you don't want to learn how to sharpen, you're missing a part of woodturning that is a necessary element and makes you a better overall woodworker in general. For what you pay for a half dozen replacement carbide cutters, you can buy slow speed grinder and jig to sharpen most tools.

If you want to buy carbide because you don't know how to use traditional turning tools, you're missing the boat. There is great satisfaction in learning how each different tool is designed to cut. Once you understand the basics, you'll find some basic turning tools can do many different types of cuts that aren't possible with carbide cutters.

So, to each his own. I own some Easywood tools that I bought at a tool sale. It took me awhile to get some decent results from them. But, they rarely come off my tool rack. I use them for a few certain cuts in hollowing, and that's about it. I can do a much better job with my traditional tools and have a ton more fun while doing it.

If you don't know how to sharpen, that's ok, it takes a little time. But with today's jigs, and perhaps with someone showing you the first time or two, its really not that hard. Soon you will become one with your tools.

The other thing I will mention, if you are a new turner, search out a turning club in your area. If its within an hour and a half drive, it's still well worth it. You will learn far more, far faster than you can on your own. Plus you will make a lot of new friends and meet a lot of really nice people.

Mike Hawkins;)
 

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The guys are right about all of the tools, each has a place in turning. I personally own 5 different carbides because they do certain jobs that I need done better than other tools. But I also own a rack full of traditional tools as well as some I made. Each has a place in the turning I do.

I played golf for years and carried 15 clubs because each did a job, same thing with our lathe tools each does a job.

I am not the best at sharpening quickly but it really isn't that hard and it is part of the process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I totally understand where your coming from and wood like to do it the right way with traditional tools and sharping. I looked into a turning club and they are actually shutting it down cause of lack of Participation, but I have hooked up with a guy that does some turning but mainly sells burl wood to turners. I hope its not a dying trade.
 

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Dave If your not getting a good finish of the Hunter Hercules you must be using it differently than I do. I have just finished turning some black locust and also some Osage Orange. I can easily get an equal or better finish with the Hunter Hercules or Hunter Osprey.
I use it as a bevel rubbing tool for the really clean cuts. I did a test one day during a demo and cut part of the surface with my Thompson bowl gouge which has a 50 degree grind. Then cut another part with my Henry Taylor bowl gouge sharpened at 40 degrees. Then I used my Thompson Detail gouge which is sharpened at 35 degrees. Then I used the Hunter Osprey. You could see the improvement in the cut at each level.
I frequently use my Hunter tools to clean up box interior or when I have an area in a bowl that just won't cut clean with my gouge. It works almost every time.
The trick is to take lighter cuts. On small turnings I turn the speed up so the tool cuts smaller bites with each rotation. On bigger bowls I simply back off the pressure on the tool and let it cut.
 

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Dave If your not getting a good finish of the Hunter Hercules you must be using it differently than I do. I have just finished turning some black locust and also some Osage Orange. I can easily get an equal or better finish with the Hunter Hercules or Hunter Osprey.
John, I love my Hunter Hercules tool and can normally get a very nice surface.

My comment was not about the tool in general, but rather this particular walnut blank. It is very difficult to cut in this green state. My friend and I were very surprised at the long stringy fibres in the core. Coring this blank was very difficult. Lots of catches. At times I watched the banjo flex and felt it may break.

In the same session we cored two cherry blanks without issues.

I have not figured out why it was so difficult to clean up the stringy walnut fibres. I have used the Hunter Hercules and my other tools on dry walnut without any issues. It is a surprise that this green walnut can be so difficult to get a clean cut.
 

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Most people I teach here are handicapped so Easy tools give them a better chance in wood turning an Hollowing, realy great for the one arm guys an gals, it gives them a since of accomplishment so I encourage them to use them. But on the other hand some like the other tools to but there not as safe as the easy tools for safty for them.
 

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I use a Sorby Turnmaster, the interchangeable tips are great. You can sharpen the round tips with a quick few wipes across 800 grit emory paper laid on glass...ken
 

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Dave I got ya. Missunderstood. I have also had walnut do the fiber thing. It happens with really green wood. Usually just one spot on the bowl and no tool will stop it. I had that happen on green Box elder. I soak it with thinned lacquer, let it dry and then recut the area. That usually does it.
 

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Dave I got ya. Missunderstood. I have also had walnut do the fiber thing. It happens with really green wood. Usually just one spot on the bowl and no tool will stop it. I had that happen on green Box elder. I soak it with thinned lacquer, let it dry and then recut the area. That usually does it.
Thanks, it is reassuring to know we were not doing something wrong. I had not experienced this before. It does seem to be a specific area in the blank.

We have two more blanks from the same walnut stump to core. We will be watching for the fibres.
 

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I was in the same mindset when I started turning. I thought it would be simpler to just use easy wood tools and not learn how to use traditional tools. Well, unless you just plan to turn pens or something, its not really possible. There are things you just cant do with carbide cutters not to mention its not possible to get clean cuts on some woods. Im not saying not to get carbides. I love mine and use them all the time, in fact I use them more than my traditional tools but they cant be your only tools. Also if you only have carbides your gonna go broke buying new cutters. They run from 14 to 20 bucks each depending on the size and shape and they dont stay sharp near as long as they would lead you to believe. That said, I do sharpen mine. They are really simple to sharpen. They wont tell you how to sharpen them because they need you to run to the store and buy new ones when they are dull but you can sharpen them. Like someone stated above, for the price of half a dozen cutters you can buy a nice slow speed grinder and a sharpening jig. Dont let sharpening tradtional tools intimidate you. With the proper jig (Oneway Wolverine) anyone can sharpen lathe tools and make them look like they were done by a professional and it only takes a fews seconds to put a fresh edge on a tool.

Just another FYI, I dunno if RusDemka is still making and selling tools or not but if you look him up, he can definately point you in the right direction to making your own easy wood tools. You can make your own set for less than the cost of buying one of thiers. Just saying. I have 6 or 8 of them and none of them say Easy Wood on them but all of them look and work just as well.:thumbsup:
 
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I have the 8 piece carbide set, non are genuine ewt, all use the EWT cutters or once you can get on ebay for a fraction of the price. Didn't spend a fortune on them, but i have noticed myself leaning towards the traditional tools more just because of the quality of the cut. Everyone has their own opinion on these. Get some for yourself and see what you think.. But try to make them yourself if you can ;)
 
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