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Hello. When I started woodworking I was under the impression that if drawers are not dovetailed they are pretty much crap and not good enough. That isn't necessarily true. Here is my construction method of choice for making drawers. I have never had a drawer failure when making them this way. I hope this is a little less intimidating for those starting out. Here's a short video:

 

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Interesting video, thanks for posting it. I have a different opinion about good fast drawer construction. First off, no offense, but, IMO, pocket screws are junk joinery. I do agree with using ½" plywood for the sides, and running a groove for a ¼" bottom. As long as you have the saw set up for groove depth, it would be perfect for cutting rabbets on the sides.

So, we have the front and back let in the rabbets with glue. They can be clamped at this stage, and fasteners (staples or brad nails) shot in through the front and back at a slight angle into the sides. That way, no fasteners will show. For shop or utility drawers fasteners can be shot into the front and back through the sides.

As for assembly, when the bottom is cut for the grooves it's a friction fit, so it will help square the drawer. While upside down I use a framing square to check the drawer for square while installing screws from the bottom into the back. This is just how I do it.






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Interesting video, thanks for posting it. I have a different opinion about good fast drawer construction. First off, no offense, but, IMO, pocket screws are junk joinery. I do agree with using ½" plywood for the sides, and running a groove for a ¼" bottom. As long as you have the saw set up for groove depth, it would be perfect for cutting rabbets on the sides.

So, we have the front and back let in the rabbets with glue. They can be clamped at this stage, and fasteners (staples or brad nails) shot in through the front and back at a slight angle into the sides. That way, no fasteners will show. For shop or utility drawers fasteners can be shot into the front and back through the sides.

As for assembly, when the bottom is cut for the grooves it's a friction fit, so it will help square the drawer. While upside down I use a framing square to check the drawer for square while installing screws from the bottom into the back. This is just how I do it.
I use pretty much the same method with prefinished maple plywood that I edgeband on the top edge. My front and back are rabbeted in 1/16" just to take away the slick surface and make a good glue joint. I've never had a drawer fail even in commercial applications. I know of commercial shops which use the same method using melamine (particle board core) and they do surprisingly well.
 

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Jay, thanks for posting. When I started woodworking a year ago, it was the Kreg jig that gave me the initial confidence to build things squarely and quickly. I made my shop drawers this same way. I still use my Kreg jig in certain cases, but have gained a lot more confidence to use more traditional joinery.
 

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Jay, thanks for posting. When I started woodworking a year ago, it was the Kreg jig that gave me the initial confidence to build things squarely and quickly. I made my shop drawers this same way. I still use my Kreg jig in certain cases, but have gained a lot more confidence to use more traditional joinery.
very well stated.

i'll add that the pocket hole is another type of joinery for our arsenal, and the more the better in my opinion. (i personally think they work extremely well for face frames)
 

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I've refaced most all of our kitchen cabinets and have used the kreg jig for assembly of all of the refacing surfaces. Since we're going for a knotty pine look, I also used screws and plugs to attach the new face frames. You can't see the pocket screws, and with glue, they're not gonna move.
 
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