Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello -
I am new to forum, (and a beginner with furniture) and looking for some assistance on my current project.

I am about to finish a PINE kitchen table, but the legs have an orange color them, versus the traditional "White" of the rest of it. I want to make both of these surfaces to match as closely as possible.

My plan to finish is to apply Conditioner, Then Water Based Dye (Brown), Then Clear Shellac, Then A Glaze (with Van **** Brown Oil Paint), Then top coat. My goal is to create an "Aged" look based on article I read online about this finishing process.

I have attached a photo of the table, and a closeup of the two surfaces.

My thought was to add, some red to the dye mixture I apply to the "white" surfaces, and omit the red for the surfaces that are a little red-ish...

Any thoughts on what color would best turn the white pine to match the red pine, that I could add to the dye for the white surfaces?

Any overall thoughts on how to accomplish this? Unfortunately I do not have any spare pine with this red color to experiment on...

And if you feel this is impossible, I can accept that :blink:


Thanks!
Dave
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,983 Posts
Most of the time you can't just pick up a dye and have the right color. It usually takes mixing several different colors. I usually use Mohawk Finishing Products alcohol dyes. The closest color they sell is M520-205 Mustard but it's a little yellow. I would probably add M520-242 Red to it. They also have the Blendal powder stains which is the same thing that would be easier to mail order. The closest color in that is M370-476 Burnt Sienna. It would just mix with alcohol. It comes in 1oz and 16 oz containers. Probably for a table it would take 2oz using more thinner than dye if you are spraying it, double if wiping. All you really want is to bring the pine to the color of the douglas fir legs. Transtint dyes can be mixed with water but they don't have as good of a selection. Looking at their color chart it would probably take a mixture of medium brown, Dk mission oak and reddish brown. Be sure you also put a finish over the dye on your test pieces to see if the color is right.

One piece of missing info: What is the topcoat? If you plan to use a polyurethane then you must use a de-waxed shelac such as zinsser sealcoat because polyurethane won't adhere well to standard shellac.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Steve! I think I will purchase several that you selected, and do some experimenting. Also, thanks very much for mentioning the De-Waxed!!! I think that piece of info was in the article I read....but I completely forgot!

On a separate topic, I plan on wetting the pine before my final sanding step, to raise grain, and then knock down. When I do this, am I supposed to let the surface completely dry and then sand, or sand while it is still wet?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,983 Posts
Thanks Steve! I think I will purchase several that you selected, and do some experimenting. Also, thanks very much for mentioning the De-Waxed!!! I think that piece of info was in the article I read....but I completely forgot!

On a separate topic, I plan on wetting the pine before my final sanding step, to raise grain, and then knock down. When I do this, am I supposed to let the surface completely dry and then sand, or sand while it is still wet?

Thanks!
You would wait for the wood to dry before sanding. Sometimes I get impatient and use a hair dryer to rush it but the water needs to be gone.

The sealcoat is shellac like regular shellac but they process it more and filter the wax out of it. Polyurethane doesn't adhere very well anyway and there is enough wax in standard shellac that it won't stick well.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top