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Discussion Starter #1
Why can't I sand a pencil mark off? I'm working with hard Maple, Walnut, and Padauk. I put a pencil mark over the wood as reference for my sanding stages. I sanded the pencil mark off of the Walnut & Padauk, but it is not coming off of the Maple, even with 100 grit paper on a belt sander. Does anyone have suggestions, to get it off?

Eric
 

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Sanding is a waste of time

I wore out a lot of sandpaper before I found that a simple pink gum eraser will do the job, better and faster.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm getting ready to head but the dum board! The easer isn't working either, it's just one of the pink easers. I guess I need to just keep on working with it. What may of caused this?

Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #7
sawdustfactory said:
Get out a card scraper or smithing plane, gone in just a few strokes.
Can I use a card scraper on the end grain? That is where my pencil marks. I'm not sure what a smithing plane is?

Eric
 

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DNA -denatured alcohol
Absolutely! The DNA or Lacquer Thinner actually floats the graphite out of the wood.

The other important thing is to use soft lead in the pencil. (HB or 2B seem to work the best as they don't gouge the wood.)

BTW - I've had Minwax Antique Oil Finish float the graphite out of the wood when I actually wanted it to show.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, I got it out in about 6 spots with my block plain. But, this has never happened to me before and don't understand why it happened. It is on a end grain cutting board, on the end grain, last out of the three woods it was only the Maple. Does anyone have an idea what the problem was? Thanks for everyone's help.

Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #13
rrich said:
Absolutely! The DNA or Lacquer Thinner actually floats the graphite out of the wood. The other important thing is to use soft lead in the pencil. (HB or 2B seem to work the best as they don't gouge the wood.) BTW - I've had Minwax Antique Oil Finish float the graphite out of the wood when I actually wanted it to show.
I tried rubbing alcohol, no dice, acetone, no dice, the easer I had was just a basic red easer, no dice. I didn't have access to the other styles of easers. The pencils I usually use is a basic carpenters pencil or a #2. The one I had in my hand today was a carpenters pencil, I threw that thing away.

Eric
 

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I have always had better luck with the white erasers we used in engineering classes. I don't know if the are exactly the same but I bought a package of six at Wal Mart for a couple of dollars. Back to school sale. Made in China. The ones thirty years ago were probably Statler Mars or Grammercy and made in Europe or Japan.

The white ones worked a lot better than the pink ones in grade school.
 

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I tried rubbing alcohol, no dice, acetone, no dice, the easer I had was just a basic red easer, no dice. I didn't have access to the other styles of easers. The pencils I usually use is a basic carpenters pencil or a #2. The one I had in my hand today was a carpenters pencil, I threw that thing away.

Eric
Maybe it contained depleted uranium.:eek:
 

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Hey Dave P.,
Many thanks for the suggestions to get those Staedtler Mars Plastic erasers. Just ordered a pack of 5 on Amazon.
I had been using a gum eraser and, while it worked well, it sure goes away fast.
I've never had to get rid of pencil marks on end grain, though. I'm sure that would be more difficult.
And, like Eric, even on any face grain, neither DNA, Acetone or lacquer thinner worked well.
 

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Hey Dave P.,
Many thanks for the suggestions to get those Staedtler Mars Plastic erasers. Just ordered a pack of 5 on Amazon.
I had been using a gum eraser and, while it worked well, it sure goes away fast.
I've never had to get rid of pencil marks on end grain, though. I'm sure that would be more difficult.
And, like Eric, even on any face grain, neither DNA, Acetone or lacquer thinner worked well.
You are welcome. I have tried a number of different erasers. The white ones work better than other coloured rubber, but the Staedler Mars work the best. Takes me back decades to engineering drawing at high school. A lot of pencil marks needed to be erased back in those days. :smile:
 

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I think the penetration might have something to do with the pressure applied in the original line marking. A fairly hard pencil, fairly hard wood and the plastizied pencil lead stuff gets pushed into the pores, as small as they are in maple. Then the friction of erasing almost remelts the lead line.

Most of my wood carving is western red cedar or yellow cedar. I need center lines, drawings, etc. With wood that soft, I have to be careful to avoid dents in the wood with the lines. As I carve, I have to keep restoring the lines since my left/right symmetry skill is still nearly non-existent. I bought a box (12?) really cheap "graphite" pencils at Staples Office Supply. They're OK on harder wood like birch but about a HB harness = too much for cedar.
Sharpened on a piece of junk sandpaper, I'm using an artist's 4B pencil. Very light pressure leaves a good mark that I can get off with an artist's "kneaded" eraser which is a really soft, almost gooey thing.

When all else fails, I have been fairly successful carving off the lines with a 3F/8 Pfeil gouge.
The '3' is a very shallow sweep, F = fishtail shape, 8mm (approx 1/3") wide.
 
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