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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Still thinking of a drum sander. Just have to make room for it.
Question: If I were to make a table top with a few glue-ups out of a hardwood like padauk, about how many passes would be needed with 100 grit to remove an uneven seam with around a 1/16" difference in thickness. This uneven thickness would be from more than likely, a glue-up line.
 

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I know that padauk was just an example to show hardness of the wood, okay?

However ... just thinking about a drum sander and paduak - you'd "paint the shop red." (Well, maybe orange.) Padauk sawdust is the messiest I have ever encountered. It can stain woods, fabric, clothing, and more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Whenever I use padauk, which is not all that rare, everything turns orange and red. Besides sweeping and vacuuming, the air compressor air jet does wonders for cleaning it up or rather blowing it out.
 

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I use a jet 16/32 with 80 for all of my 'milling' needs as I have a self imposed noise limit which planner violates. For 1/16 of an inch that would be 4-6 passes [depending on hardness and keeping the paper clean.

Even with a two stage dust collector padauk is troublesome but worth it!

Russ
 

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where's my table saw?
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Still thinking of a drum sander. Just have to make room for it.
Question: If I were to make a table top with a few glue-ups out of a hardwood like padauk, about how many passes would be needed with 100 grit to remove an uneven seam with around a 1/16" difference in thickness. This uneven thickness would be from more than likely, a glue-up line.
What size?
I have a dual drum 24" with 3 HP, and you can put different grits on each drum to go from 100 to 150 for example.
I also have a Grizzly "baby drum" 12" with 1.5 HP. It is much more finicky about feed depth, typically about 1/32" per pass.
 

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@Tony B do you have a lathe? If so, why not turn a drum of sorts on the lathe, and build an adjustable platen that rides on the lathe bed that you can raise and lower? That would certainly help you be more space efficient...
 

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where's my table saw?
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There's more than one type of drum sander!
This type doesn't use a powered feed platten:
 

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Still thinking of a drum sander. Just have to make room for it.
Question: If I were to make a table top with a few glue-ups out of a hardwood like padauk, about how many passes would be needed with 100 grit to remove an uneven seam with around a 1/16" difference in thickness. This uneven thickness would be from more than likely, a glue-up line.
For leveling out a panel you would use 60 or 80 grit. It would probably take 4-5 passes. 100 would be too fine.

I have a Supermax. The dust collection is nothing short of amazing. I guarantee your shop won’t be covered in red dust 😁.

Prior to that I had a dual drum IMO there is no real advantage. The DC was horrible on that machine (Grizzly).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
@DrRobert Thanks for the encouraging info.
I am thinking of the 16-32 SuperMax
Wish I could go larger but neither my budget or electrical can handle it.
Generally, I never make many tables more that 20 or so inches deep. Would be nice to handle it in one pass but no can do. I just finished a writing table for my daughter. It was around 19" deep. With the 16-32, almost everything will require both long sides to be flipped around. This is the reason that I have hesitated on purchasing it so far. I have been using a recently purchased (not cheap) 4x24 Makita belt sander. I have used 4x24's in the past. Not even closely related to a 3x24.
Dealing with Laguna customer service is great. Had 1 minor problem with my Fusion 2 table saw. They sent the parts immediately.
 

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Timely topic. Do those of you with a Drum Sander, recommend getting one for furniture/cabinetry and architectural woodworking?

The price is a bit steep, but it seems like one would save me a lot of tedious sanding work on cabinetry and furniture projects. It's also like the last major type of tool that I lack in my shop. Seems like it would be very nice in getting more of a funiture-grade sanding on some of my projects after using a planer or re-sawing on my bandsaw.

My sanding options presently include PC orbital sander with vacuum hose, an Grizzly benchtop oscillating spindle sander, a cheap corded Ryobi belt sander, and a small HF benchtop disc/belt sander that I'm tempted to donate to charity. I end up doing most of my sanding with the hand-held PC random orbital unit, but that can still get a little rough with my hands still recovering from severe carpal tunnel syndrome.
 

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I am thinking of the 16-32 SuperMax
That's the one I have and have run up to 30" wide glue ups through. It's critical on the wider than 16" that the inflow and outflow tables are level [side to side] with the drum's table. On the really wide work side support is necessary to keep from digging a trench in the work. Extremely annoying to sand out.

Do those of you with a Drum Sander, recommend getting one for furniture/cabinetry and architectural woodworking?
While drum sanders are much slower than planers they are quieter, easier to maintain and don't have tear out issues with highly figured wood.

If I ever get to a place where I can run a planer [no connected wall neighbors] I can see the utility in time savings running a planer in reducing thick or extremely hard / dense wood vs. the 38 grit gravel parking lot on paper on the drum sander.

Russ
 

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That's the one I have and have run up to 30" wide glue ups through. It's critical on the wider than 16" that the inflow and outflow tables are level [side to side] with the drum's table. On the really wide work side support is necessary to keep from digging a trench in the work. Extremely annoying to sand out.



While drum sanders are much slower than planers they are quieter, easier to maintain and don't have tear out issues with highly figured wood.

If I ever get to a place where I can run a planer [no connected wall neighbors] I can see the utility in time savings running a planer in reducing thick or extremely hard / dense wood vs. the 38 grit gravel parking lot on paper on the drum sander.

Russ
How is a drum sander easier to maintain than a planer...
 

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where's my table saw?
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Given my experience, you need both. The drum sander leaves a great, smooth even surface with no almost invisible "scallops" .
I don't always get them, but you'll see them if you don't use a sander of some type.
Dust collection can be an issue and I completely modified the dust hood on the Grizzly 12" sander.
I think I bough an additional hood in case my ideas didn't work our, but they did.
I like it, it's just a little underpowered. A 2 HP would have been better.
I know nothing about the Performax, except it's been around forever.
Engineering Gas Window Machine Spinning
 

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My buddy at Mike Netherton cabinets had a 24" dual head Grizzly.. He used for cabinet doors for years. Worked great.

At home shop I no longer use one. I get by with a belt sander easily, and I build a lot of stuff...
 
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