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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a drum sander, and it seems obvious to me that I am going to need an infeed and outfeed table for it. I am interested in seeing some of Y'all's. This is also my first experience with a drum sander, so any warnings or tips would be appreciated.
 

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I happen to have a Performax 16/32 which came with the factory infeed and outfeed tables. Not worth taking a picture. Easy to see on-line.

Nothing special about these tables. Make then as long as you desire and arrange to be parallel to the main drive belt.

I recommend using the blue zirconia abrasive from Klingspor. Expensive, but worth it. Less heat, easier to clean, less likely to gum up.

http://www.woodworkingshop.com/category.aspx?id=22&f4=ALUMINUM+ZIRCONIA

Changing the wraps is a PITA. I just use 80 grit. I would not go above 120 grit. This will get gummed up in a single pass.

Get a cleaning stick. You are going to need it.

http://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/bs99801/

Use LIGHT passes, go slow and watch out for heat. If the wood has resins they will melt on the wrap and cause burnt streaks on the wrap and on the wood. Then time to change the wrap.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Dave. I will for sure tryout that paper. If there is one thing I have learned running a random orbit, it is that the paper matters. I just picked up a shop fox w1678. Looking at it makes me think I could attach In and outfeed tables to the sander. I am hoping some of the guys and gals here have done some creative stuff with theirs that will get me thinking.

image-228394695.jpg
 

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bzguy
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Unless your going to run pieces so large that if you walk away they will tip the machine over, the in and out-feed rollers hold the work flat enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well I am not worried about the machine tipping over. It's probably 300+ pounds (guess). May be I don't have the pressure rollers adjusted correctly. The few pieces I sent through and didn't support had some "sander snipe" if that is such a thing. The board was probably in the 34" range in length.
 

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Snipe on both ends? Adding pressure to rollers should help unless that a 36"X6" piece .. I usually just hold edge coming and going, a little walk around in the middle
 

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not sure on your model, but most drum sanders of this variety adjust the belt height up and down to accomodate different thickness material. this makes infeed and outfeed table needing to follow the height of the belt, which is probably why most people don't go with them. we do have a table several inches lower than the belt to "catch" the material coming out, so we can feed more than one item without walking around.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
no really it's me

ok to add some confusion, this is my thread. update to my phone caused me to loose my user name and password. haven't actually logged in for years by typing the info. when I got on the computer and tried to reset the password it sent me to another username that I had apparently set up using the same email address. Anyway I got that fixed.

now as for the outfeed table, the conveyer belt does go up and down which is why I thought of attaching it to the sander in a way that it would move with the conveyer. I am new to a drum sander, I literally had zero experience with one before I brought this home. So I have not been around and watched as others have used one and gleaned any knowledge. If I do as has been suggested, support the piece in and out by hand, it sands the wood flawlessly. I am very happy with how well it sands. I intend on sanding resawn veneers with it. I have read where people use a piece of mdf and double face tape as a sled to sand thinner than the stated capacity of the machine. Would anyone here have any experience with that?
 

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bzguy
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I have used jigs like this with good results.
You can just design it with room for a "custom" cleat on the bottom that bumps into the in-feed side of the machine to hold it in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Bzguy, I am not so sure I follow what you are saying. Are you taking about a stop at the rear of the piece. The rear being the last part to go through the sander?
 
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