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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Went and picked up some nice solid brass bench dogs. Now I just have to drill the 1/2" holes in my work bench. Thickness of the bench is not an issue, they will be firmly seated in wood for their entire length. Problem is drilling the holes. Usually for any hole larger than 3/8" I go for my forstner bits and use my drill press. However, this being my bench it's not the kind of thing I can clamp in my drill press. This along with forstner bits not working all that well in my hand held drill I'm a little stumped. I have noticed (in times of desperation) when I had tried to use a forstner bit in my hand held drill that the hole is not straight and tends to wonder. Also the length of the hole is offering some issues. I have seen forstner bit extenders but have heard things about them wobbling... and of course this brings be back to having to use a forstner bit in my drill.

Do I need an extra long spade bit, an auger bit... or is there another solution to this that I'm not seeing that would give me a straighter better hole?
 

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You could use a spade bit. I used my forstners though in my handheld drill for my dog holes. Actually I use them all the time in my handheld drill I never had a problem with them wandering, maybe its time for a new bit?
 

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I would either make or buy a guide to be clamped to the bench.

I have recently seen this one. Looks handy.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/20...de-Standard-Size-Portable-Drilling-Guide.aspx

For 1/2in hole I would use a brad point bit, which should cause less tearout at the bench surface than a twist drill.

If you want to make your own guide, you can get long drill bits. They flex, but the 1/2in diameter should be fine. Then drill 1/2in hole in a piece of dense hardwood. You want at least a couple of inch depth. Clamp this to the bench same as the link above.

If you have a dowel jig, you can take it apart and use the centre guide to be clamped to the bench.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000782/9874/Deluxe-Doweling-Jig.aspx
 

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Your not gonna drill 5 inches with a plunge router, not safely anyway. If you the holes are perpendicular to the top then a plunge router would work well to establish the hole and then finish them up with a forstner bit. Another option and the one Id probably use would be this:
Promax 79251 Precision Drill Guide Tool for Portable and Electric Drills - Amazon.com

I sure the base would clamp easily or could be modified easily as well.
 

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John
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Whats the best method of making a 5" deep hole with my router?
No good way I know of. Largest amount of plunge on any consumer type router is about 3" (Bosch MRP23). It would, however, give you a nice smooth hole deep enough to use as a drill guide to finish up with a hand drill. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Dont think I want to invest in a tool only for this. I will probably go with the longest spiral bit i can find. Should be it straight and perpendicular within acceptable tolerances.
 

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John
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Dont think I want to invest in a tool only for this. I will probably go with the longest spiral bit i can find. Should be it straight and perpendicular within acceptable tolerances.

If you are planning on finishing it with a drill anyway, no point in spending a lot to get extra length. This is about as cheap a deal as I have found on solid carbide, 1/2" spirals. Only 1-1/4" cutting length but plenty to use as a drill guide.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vermont-Ame...119365673?pt=Routers_Bits&hash=item5ad4ed1c29:smile:
 

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I'll just throw this out and you can see if it would work for you.

I bored my 3" bench top and my Paulk benches the same way. The Paulk table is 1/2", but I bored the 2 tops, clamped one on top of the other.

First, I laid out the grid with a tape measure and framing square. Then, with a 3/4" spade bit, I drilled a ~1/4" deep pilot hole. The spade bits point aids in locating the holes.

Finally, I used a 3/4" HSS spiral upcut router bit ($13.95 MLCS) to bore the holes the rest of the way. I finished off the holes with a large Lee Valley countersink drill bit.


 

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No good way I know of. Largest amount of plunge on any consumer type router is about 3" (Bosch MRP23). It would, however, give you a nice smooth hole deep enough to use as a drill guide to finish up with a hand drill. :smile:
Why couldn't you put the Forstner bit in the plunger router, with little to no extension for the first few inches and then just loosen the collette and extend the Forstner down the collette for the remaining distance?
 

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John
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Why couldn't you put the Forstner bit in the plunger router, with little to no extension for the first few inches and then just loosen the collette and extend the Forstner down the collette for the remaining distance?
Router runs about 20 times faster than a forstner is supposed to turn. Forstner takes a shallow cut every turn and pulls itself down. I could see the bit binding and you getting spun around:blink::thumbdown:
 

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I would make a drilling template

It would be a full set of holes across the bench. It would be 1" or so thick to guide the drill vertically to start with. It would be made using a drill press to insure the holes are vertical. I would use a Forstner bit or an auger/self feeding bit. A typical HHS metal drill will get too hot in the hole that deep and it will have to be cleaned out frequently.

I am assuming the holes will go all the way through the bench top?
 

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Is it assembled yet? I set up some "outfeed supports" and used my drill press to make mine prior to assembly.

If you have a bit brace it wouldn't take too long if you're not doing too many holes, and you could make a guide block on the drill press to keep it square.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Am I wrong or would the dogs have to be 100% perfeclty parallel. If there off perpendicular 1/8" or so would the performance be hampered.
 

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I think if you're doing a square dog lamination you're encouraged to put them at an angle. For round dogs I don't think most people bother. You could always put an angled face on the dog.
 
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