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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to this forum but am looking for some advise. I bought a used Central Machinery benchtop drill press for a Cub Scout project where I needed a press and didn't want to spend a lot. Found a 16 speed 3 pulley press with a 3/4 hp motor and built stout. Thought it would work fine, which it did, but I started noticing that the holes were not always consistent. I was playing around with it and lowered it down to different depths and pushed and pulled it and there is slop. Initially I thought it might be the spindle bearings since this was manufactured in 1988 per the motor tag. So I took it apart and dropped the quill out and all the bearings are tight as can be. But as I slid the quill in and out of the housing I could feel there is a bit of slop, don't know how much yet as I need to get a caliper to check the inside and outside diameters of the hole and quill.

What I am wondering is whether there is some fix for this, or whether I live with it, or do I chuck it and get something else. The head case is not split so there is no bolt to tighten it up. Has anyone tried some type of shim? I'm guessing there is a .003-.005" slop that I might be able to put a shim of some sort in to fix.

I would hate to throw it out as everything else about this drill is built well, but if it can't drill consistent holes, what is the use of having a drill press?
 

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Just a thought

But when you mentioned the case is not split, why not split it with a saw kerf and use a through bolt or 2 to compress it together? Without knowing the construction it's hard to recommend a solution. There are nylon tipped set screws that could be drilled and tapped into the casting. Pilot hole and finished holes would help keep things centered for now. JMO. bill
 

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Housing

Is there a sleeve of some sort that the quill slides in?
If so it may be worn. You may have to replace it if it is. Check with a local machine shop to see if they can open up the housing an put in an oil bronze sleeve. This will help in lubricating the quill also.
If they can, have them make a couple of extra sleeves for you. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here's a picture

Here is a picture of the case and quill. It's probably not worth splitting the case, but drilling and putting in a nylon tipped set screw with a jamb nut might work to put enough pressure to push it against the side and reduce the slop. Wonder if the quill will go up and down easy with one. Can I take the screw out that sits in the slot to keep the quill from turning out and replace it? What about one of those rotating ball tipped set screws?

There is no sleeve inside, remember, it's a cheap press that was made in Tiawan.

Thanks for the ideas.
 

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nylon plug/screw

Drilling and tapping for a nylon plug/tipped screw will work.
One other item you may want to check also, what type of chuck is on the quill?
Can you check the run out of the chuck? It also may be that the taper that the chuck is pushed into is running out from the od of the quill. If this is the case you will not be able to drill a hole that is the same size as the drill. It will always be oversize.
I have a Craftsman 12" floor stand drill press and have issues with the original Jacobs chuck running out. The chuck can be replaced with a better quality chuck.
I have considered putting a locking screw of some sort on my quill as well.
If you do this, take out the quill and use a good quality drill bit and tap. Or have a local machine shop do it for you.
I would not go any smaller than a threaded hole of 3/8" if you can.
 
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